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Courses



AAAD 89-001: Youth Activism, Citizenship, and Social Change in Africa

FY Seminar | TTH, 9:30 AM – 10:45 AM | Instructor(s): Eunice Sahle

This First-Year Seminar (FYS) explores the role of youth in processes of social change on the African continent historically and in the contemporary era. It begins with an exploration of youth’s experiences and involvement in liberation struggles against colonial rule. With a focus on the post-1980s period, it examines youth mobilization for democratization, human rights, and horizontal accountability by state actors. Further, it explores youth activism in the context of new media. Additionally, it highlights how the African Union and regional organizations are creating spaces for youth’s civic engagement. This FYS provides students with a generative opportunity to study dynamics of youth activism and citizenship, and processes of social change in various countries on the Africa continent.

Eunice Sahle

Professor Sahle is a political scientist whose current research examines dynamics of human rights, constitutionalism, development, sustainability, and citizenship on the African continent. She is completing a book that focuses on dynamics of human rights in the context of new constitutional frameworks in Malawi and Kenya. Her other contemporary research project explores modalities of citizenship, including youth's citizenship in Kenya in the post-2010 period. Additionally, in collaboration with one of her former UNC-CH students and a Malawian colleague, she is working on a research project that examines opportunities and challenges pertaining to the realization of sexual reproductive health and rights with a focus on the youth in Malawi.

 

AAAD 89-002: Afro-Latina/os in the U.S.

FY Seminar | TTH, 9:30 AM – 10:45 AM | Instructor(s): Maya Berry

What does it mean to be both racially Black and ethnically Latino in the U.S.? This course will look at the history, culture, experiences, political struggles, and social dilemmas of “Afro-Latinos”: African-descended peoples from Latin America and the Spanish-speaking Caribbean who reside in the U.S. The erasure of these communities, along with their struggles for well-being, prosperity, belonging, and visibility, will be explored. This course provides an opportunity for a deeper understanding of the legacies of the transatlantic slave trade, ethno-nationalism, and U.S. foreign-policy, and their connection to contemporary issues of migration, inequality, and anti-blackness. In-depth conversations about the politics of “race” and “ethnicity” will trouble dominant U.S. paradigms of identity. In this discussion-oriented class, we will engage with a variety of sources, from academic books and scholarly articles to film. Students will synthesize their understanding through daily forum posts, a collaboratively-prepared presentation, an essay, and a group research project.

Maya Berry

Maya Berry is a sociocultural anthropologist who writes on topics related to race, gender, politics, and performance in Cuba, as well as black feminist approaches to ethnographic methods more broadly. She earned a PhD. in Anthropology from University of Texas at Austin and an MA in Performance Studies from New York University. Prior to joining AAAD at UNC-Chapel Hill, she was a postdoctoral associate at the Institute of Sacred Music at Yale University. A third-generation Afro-Cuban-American, she is practitioner and researcher of Afro-Cuban dance. For her teaching at UNC she has been awarded the Office of the Provost Engaged Scholarship Award in Engaged Teaching (2020) and the Johnston Teaching Excellence Award (2021).

 

AAAD 89-003: Gender, Marriage, and Family in African American History

FY Seminar | TTH, 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM | Instructor(s): Brandi Brimmer

What can the study of the Black family in U.S. history and culture tell us about the past and about our present? This seminar examines the history of marriage and family from slavery to freedom. It is designed with the idea that there is no one singular representative experience, but rather a multitude of voices and perspectives that comprise this history. Readings will consider the historical processes and constraints shaping Black family life in the U.S. alongside themes of resistance, adaptability, and resilience. Over the course of the semester, we will explore historians’ responses to contemporary narratives about the pathology of the Black family after the Civil War.

Brandi Brimmer

Brandi C. Brimmer (She/Her) is the Morehead-Cain Alumni Associate Professor in the Department of African, African American, and Diaspora Studies at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Her research recovers poor and working-class Black women’s battles for citizenship during the nineteenth century. She is the author of Claiming Union Widowhood: Race, Respectability, and Poverty in the Post-Emancipation South (Duke University Press, December 2020), which received Honorable Mention for the ABWH Letitia Woods Brown Memorial Book Award for the best book in African American Women’s History. Her scholarly articles have appeared in the Journal of Southern History and the Journal of the Civil War Era. Prior to joining the faculty at UNC-CH, she was a residential fellow at the National Humanities Center and taught in the Department of History at Spelman College in Atlanta, Georgia.

 

AMST 51-001: Navigating America

FY Seminar | TTH, 2:00 PM – 3:15 PM | Instructor(s): Rachel Willis

This seminar is designed to teach students how to navigate new intellectual terrain and process unfamiliar information from a variety of disciplinary perspectives with an emphasis on simulations, field study, reflections, and documentation. Each student will plan, implement, and document an individual short journey. This voyage of discovery on the campus or in the surrounding community will be chronicled with a documentary journal and presented to the class in a multi-media format that conveys the individual’s perspective, journey, and discoveries. Additionally, the class will collaboratively plan, implement, and document a common full day journey. This required field study will be a core aspect of the experiential education connection for the course.

Rachel Willis

Rachel A. Willis is a Professor of American Studies and Adjunct Professor of Economics at UNC. She has won numerous awards including the UNC Board of Governors Award for Excellence in Teaching, two Student Undergraduate Teaching Awards, and the Robert Sigmon Award for Service Learning. A three-time winner of the Chapman Award, she has been a Senior Fellow at the Global Research Institute and is a Thorp Faculty Engaged Scholar at the Carolina Center for Public Service. Her teaching methods incorporate innovative field study, collaborative assignments and experiential learning through events and programs outside of the classroom. A labor economist interested in global access to work, she has recently focused on the impact of climate change on port communities.

 

AMST 54-001: The Indians' New Worlds: Southeastern Histories from 1200 to 1800

FY Seminar | TTH, 3:35 PM – 4:50 PM | Instructor(s): Margaret Scarry | Same as: ANTH 54-001

By AD 1200, most Southeastern Indians were farmers who lived in societies ruled by hereditary chiefs. After 1500, encounters between Indians and Europeans changed the lives of all concerned, but the changes took place in, and were shaped by, existing cultures. This seminar uses reading, discussion, and lecture to examine the lives of Southern Indians and to understand how encounters and interaction with European explorers and colonists changed the worlds in which the Indians lived. Students will learn how archaeologists and historians work, both separately and together, to study the past of Native societies. Students will study and analyze archaeological artifacts, Spanish accounts of Southeastern Indians, and other primary materials in class. These activities, along with various role-playing exercises, will directly involve the students in the study of Native people in the period between 1200 and 1800. Grades will be based on class participation, two short papers, participation in a group project, and a final paper related to the group project.

Margaret Scarry

Margaret Scarry’s fascination with Native American cultures began in high school, when she participated in an archaeological field school on Summer Island, Michigan. She pursued her interest through undergraduate and graduate studies at the University of Michigan, where she earned her Ph.D. in 1986. Though her first archaeological experience was in the Midwest, she soon shifted her interest to the Southeast, where she investigates Native American foodways—the activities and ideas by which people acquire, distribute, prepare, present, consume, and think about food. Much of her research has focused on the Moundville chiefdom, which flourished in Alabama from about A.D. 1100 to 1500. After a number of years in Florida and Kentucky, Scarry joined the anthropology faculty at UNC-Chapel Hill in 1995. Among other things, she teaches courses on archaeology, food and culture, and archaeobotany.

 

AMST 89-001: Food and the Media

FY Seminar | TTH, 9:30 AM – 10:45 AM | Instructor(s): Kelly Alexander

From “rage bakers” to tragic lobsters, from sushi chefs to pitmasters, and from Guy Fieri to M.F.K. Fisher, subjects in this seminar reveal the ways in which representations of food in the media shape discourse about modern American culture. Class readings combine media and cultural studies research with journalism, linguistics, history, literary analysis, gender studies, psychology, and folklore in order to explore the ways in which foods, including (but not limited to) General Tso’s chicken, industrially produced meat, and pumpkin pie have become part of the weft and weave of contemporary American social life. Class topics will center on the history of food advertising in America; the rise of the American cookbook industry; the uses and meanings of food on social media platforms; and the role of food in literature and on film. Ultimately, we analyze the ways in which representations of food and eating connect to and even drive social and political debates. The course emphasizes practical learning (short weekly writing prompts; film and textual analysis skills; and one final research-based project using primary and secondary sources).

Kelly Alexander

Kelly Alexander is an Assistant Professor and George B. Tindall Fellow in the American Studies Department. Her research focuses on questions of food politics and ethics, particularly on food as a form of care. She holds a doctorate in Cultural Anthropology from Duke University and a Bachelor of Science in Journalism from Northwestern University. She has worked as an editor at Saveur magazine, where she won a James Beard Journalism Award, and is co-author of a best-selling cookbook on barbecue with pitmaster Myron Mixon. She has written about the value of vintage relish trays; the enduring business model of Hooter's; the horticultural triumphs of Michigan cherries; and the cultural significance of Popeye's fried chicken sandwiches. Her latest research is on a network of people from chefs to policymakers engaging in grassroots efforts to recirculate food waste in Brussels, Belgium.

 

AMST 89-002: Asian Americans in the U.S. South

FY Seminar | MWF, 11:15 AM – 12:05 PM | Instructor(s): Kita Douglas

In this seminar, we will study the history, cultures, and documentation of Asian Americans in the U.S. South, from the 19th century to present. Drawing on a range of sources, from oral histories and poetry to documentary film and short stories, we will examine how Asian Americans have grappled with identity, belonging and home in the South. In our studies together, we will consider how Asian Americans have navigated national and regional histories of slavery and segregation, immigration exclusion, and the shifting borderlands of the American South and the Global South. With a focus towards working with community and institutional archives, we will explore how to research, discuss, write, and create with the stories of Asian Americans throughout the region, and across time, towards a richer understanding of Asian American history and identity.

Kita Douglas

Kita Douglas is a scholar and teacher of Asian American studies. Her research focuses on Asian American art and writing, particularly graphic forms and how they are produced and circulated. She is a Teaching Assistant Professor in the Department of American Studies and teaches courses on Asian American visual culture, Asian American political and social movements, and Asian American literature. Kita is committed to creating and supporting student-driven learning projects in both the university and broader community.

 

AMST 89-003: North Carolina Black Feminisms

FY Seminar | TTH, 12:30 PM – 1:45 PM | Instructor(s): Antonia Randolph

The goal of this First-Year Seminar is to help students develop their own sense of Black feminist thought and practice through exploring the lives and works of several key Black feminist figures with ties to North Carolina. The figures are Harriet Jacobs, Anna Julia Cooper, Pauli Murray, Ella Baker, Nina Simone, Jaki Shelton Green, and Alexis Pauline Gumbs. Students will engage materials that put these figures in context of Black feminist thought and will do hands on activities that reflect Black feminist practices.

Antonia Randolph

Antonia Randolph is an assistant professor of American Studies at University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill. She is a graduate of Spelman College (BA in Sociology) and Northwestern University (PhD in Sociology). Her interests include diversity discourse in education, multicultural capital, non-normative Black masculinity, and the production of misogyny in hip-hop culture. Her book The Wrong Kind of Different: Challenging the Meaning of Diversity in American Classrooms (Teachers College 2012) examined the hierarchies elementary school teachers constructed among students of color. She has also published in Sociology of Race and Ethnicity, The Journal of Contemporary Ethnography, and The Feminist Wire. Her current book project, That’s My Heart: Queering Intimacy in Hip-Hop Culture, examines portrayals of Black men’s intimate relationships in hip-hop culture.

 

ANTH 54-001: The Indians' New Worlds: Southeastern Histories from 1200 to 1800

FY Seminar | TTH, 3:35 PM – 4:50 PM | Instructor(s): Margaret Scarry | Same as: AMST 54-001

By AD 1200, most Southeastern Indians were farmers who lived in societies ruled by hereditary chiefs. After 1500, encounters between Indians and Europeans changed the lives of all concerned, but the changes took place in, and were shaped by, existing cultures. This seminar uses reading, discussion, and lecture to examine the lives of Southern Indians and to understand how encounters and interaction with European explorers and colonists changed the worlds in which the Indians lived. Students will learn how archaeologists and historians work, both separately and together, to study the past of Native societies. Students will study and analyze archaeological artifacts, Spanish accounts of Southeastern Indians, and other primary materials in class. These activities, along with various role-playing exercises, will directly involve the students in the study of Native people in the period between 1200 and 1800. Grades will be based on class participation, two short papers, participation in a group project, and a final paper related to the group project.

Margaret Scarry

Margaret Scarry’s fascination with Native American cultures began in high school, when she participated in an archaeological field school on Summer Island, Michigan. She pursued her interest through undergraduate and graduate studies at the University of Michigan, where she earned her Ph.D. in 1986. Though her first archaeological experience was in the Midwest, she soon shifted her interest to the Southeast, where she investigates Native American foodways—the activities and ideas by which people acquire, distribute, prepare, present, consume, and think about food. Much of her research has focused on the Moundville chiefdom, which flourished in Alabama from about A.D. 1100 to 1500. After a number of years in Florida and Kentucky, Scarry joined the anthropology faculty at UNC-Chapel Hill in 1995. Among other things, she teaches courses on archaeology, food and culture, and archaeobotany.

 

ANTH 70-001: By Persons Unknown: Race and Reckoning in North Carolina

FY Seminar | TTH, 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM | Instructor(s): Glenn Hinson

“By persons unknown” is the phrase historically used across the white South to erase the identities of the killers responsible for lynchings. Though communities certainly knew who these murderers were, the press and the courts publicly denied this knowledge, offering the killers a cloak of anonymity. This research-intensive seminar explores this act of cloaking, addressing the legacy of race and racial terrorism in N.C. by using archival resources and community testimony. The class projects—focusing on a single county—will explore the public erasure of Black histories, the careful craftings of public memory, and the far-reaching impact of racist practices on the economic, educational, social, and political lives of communities. Our goal is not merely to “study” racist practice, but to actively confront it, working with community members to build public awareness of the legacies of racial violence, and assisting in efforts to create public memorials to that violence’s victims.

Glenn Hinson

By training and spirit, Glenn Hinson is a folklorist, one who works with communities to explore grassroots creativity and the many ways that it holds meaning. Though he is white, much of his work over the years has been with Black communities, whose members have repeatedly schooled him on the simple fact that any exploration of artistry must address the critical and all-encompassing context of racism. Their challenge led to the creation of the Descendants Project, a collaborative initiative in which students and communities work together to address racial histories. This FYS extends this initiative by focusing on a single NC county.

 

ANTH 89-001: A History of the World in 12 Objects

FY Seminar | MWF, 12:20 PM – 1:10 PM | Instructor(s): Douglas Smit

How did we get here? What were the major transformations in human history that created our world? What impacts have these changes made on the natural world and on us? What can we learn from this long history? This class is about objects and social change: meaning that we will use human-made objects – artifacts – as a way to understand the long and complex history of our species. We use the concept of ‘object biography’ to do this – you will each get a chance to produce an object biography of your own and to think critically about how we understand and represent material culture in museum displays.

Douglas Smit

Douglas Smit is a Teaching Assistant Professor in the Department of Anthropology. He is an archaeologist who currently directs projects in Peru and Philadelphia. His research focuses on the archaeology of the recent past, how local people have interacted with big processes like globalization over the past five hundred years. He is also a newcomer to UNC, having just moved with his partner, an infant, two dogs, and one cat to North Carolina from Philadelphia in the summer of 2022. Beyond archaeology, he loves hiking, basketball/soccer, and reading, non-fiction, although these days, it is mostly child-care.

 

ANTH 89-089: Taking up Space: Colonization, Resources, and Life Beyond Earth

FY Seminar | TTH, 9:30 AM – 10:45 AM | Instructor(s): Caela O’Connell

Our early human ancestors were great travelers moving across great distances over many generations and thousands of years. Our more recent human history is dominated by human colonization as new waves of people traversing the globe using technological innovations and paving a path of incomparable destruction and exploitation that continue to overshadow the lives of millions of people and our very planetary health to this day. In early 2020 Elon Musk, CEO of SpaceX released their campaign to “Occupy Mars” by 2050, joining a long linage of human ventures that have considered places and peoples unknown to them up for grabs and consequently, ownership and exploitation. Fantastic research, technology, international cooperation, and human advancements have come out of space research. However, the idea that life and resources outside our planet or beyond our galaxy is tenacious and remains an influential factor. In this course, we will explore our human future beyond Earth through the lens of our past asking the question is colonization inevitable? Is it possible as described in Star Trek to “explore strange new worlds, to seek out new life and new civilizations, to boldly go where no [hu]man has gone before?” without contaminating, dominating, and destroying that which exists out there? Can we as a species learn from our human past and avoid colonial mistakes? Can we handle discovering new resources without depleting them? How might discoveries made beyond Earth influence the meaning, use, and ideas about our resources here at home? Applying an anthropological lens to understand the human experience of curiosity, travel, expansion, and colonization, this class, dares to dream big and ask hard questions. This discussion-based seminar will read research and popular publications of nonfiction and fiction including a SciFi novel and ethnographic book, view films and documentaries, and look for signs of space in everyday life on Earth. Through assessment activities such as “Taking up Space” students will learn to critically break down and research the role of cultural ideas and how they influence scientific research and discovery.

Caela O’Connell

Caela O'Connell is an Assistant Professor of Anthropology and the Environment, Ecology, and Energy Program. Dr. O'Connell runs the Socio-Ecological Change Research Lab (SECR Lab) at UNC investigating different aspects of sustainability, agriculture, inequality, water, disasters, adaptation, crisis and environmental conservation and partnering with community organizations for engaged scholarship. Her work is primarily in the Caribbean and the Americas, and she’s currently working on a new project that considers human resource use and conceptions in research and development for outer space exploration. When not thinking about the future for farming and our global environment, she enjoys baking for friends, hiking (nothing too steep), taekwondo, tracking hurricanes, reading Sci-Fi and mysteries, and traveling with her family.

 

APPL 110-01F: Introduction to Design and Making: Developing Your Personal Design Potential

FY Launch | TTH, 3:30 PM – 4:45 PM | Instructor(s): Glenn Walters

Students work in flexible, interdisciplinary teams to assess opportunities, brainstorm, and prototype solutions. Design thinking and physical prototyping skills are developed through fast-paced, iterative exercises in a variety of contexts and environments.

Glenn Walters

I am a Professor of the Practice in the Department of Applied Physical Sciences at UNC Chapel Hill. In this role, I am developing and teaching courses covering fundamentals of engineering in such areas as design, fluids, hydraulics, additive manufacturing, etc. My specialty is creating curriculum that focuses on experiential activities that develop student intuition as a pathway to learning theory and practice.

 

APPL 89-001: Tree, Timber, Totem

FY Seminar | TTH, 9:30 AM – 10:45 AM | Instructor(s): Richard Superfine

Trees, through their biology, meaning and uses, create an arc of understanding that spans what it means to be human. Ultimately, we will explore the meaning of trees and wood and why we seek happiness in nature, cherish wood and the creation of objects of wood. Tree: What is a tree from a biological perspective? How do they represent a complex community and play a vital role in life on the planet? Timber: What is the economy of wood internationally and in the state of NC? What are biophysical and material properties of trees that allow them to grow so large and be so useful to human society? Totem: Why do we respond emotionally to wood and choose it as a material in our lives and surroundings? How do we design and create objects of meaning from wood? We will walk in the woods, meet “wood people” from across the state and country and learn woodworking with projects of the students’ design and creation.

Richard Superfine

I am the son of a home builder, a first gen life-long student who is also a faculty member that has a passion for studying biology using the perspective and tools of physics. In my day job at UNC I build microscopes, materials and systems to study the wonders of the lung, the body’s immune system and biomedical diagnostic technologies – all in collaboration with brilliant scientists from across UNC and the world. I also have a woodworking shop in my basement where I make from wood furniture and gifts of meaning for family and friends.

 

APPL 89-002: Convergent Research: Solving the Grand Engineering Challenges of the Future

FY Seminar | TTH, 12:30 PM – 1:45 PM | Instructor(s): Ronit Fraiman

Convergence research focuses on addressing complex problems in science, engineering, and society. Today’s and tomorrow’s grand challenges will not be solved by one discipline, but by the integration of knowledge, methods, and expertise from across various disciplines.

This first-year seminar will introduce students to the new scientific language of convergence research. Through surveying the grand challenges of engineering, we will learn how through pursuing a common research challenge, experts from various fields intermix their knowledge, theories, methods, data, and research communities, enabling new discoveries to emerge. Students will participate in various in-class activities, group discussion and problem-solving coaching to enhance understanding of how chemistry, physics, materials science, biology, math, and computer sciences are applied to engineering.

Seminar will host guest lecturers with expertise on a particular topic, allowing the students to gain a true interdisciplinary view of the subject, instead of an isolated view of each.

Ronit Fraiman

My interdisciplinary expertise in chemistry, nanotechnology, material science, and computer science allows me to study problems whose solutions are beyond the scope of a single area of research practice. I truly believe that collaborations among scientists trained in different fields are essential for exploring and tackling complex problems. As such, I am both a participant and a leader of integrated research teams involving a vast network of interdependent researchers. I develop breakthrough biologically inspired technologies to advance healthcare. My work has led to major advances in tissue engineering, nanobiotechnology, and diagnostics, and key innovations are being translated into commercial products.

 

ARTH 54H-001: Art, War, and Revolution

FY Seminar | TTH, 12:30 PM – 1:45 PM | Instructor(s): Daniel Sherman

This course explores the complex relationship between art, war, and conflict.  We will consider the tensions between glorifying war and violence and memorializing their victims, between political justification and moral outrage, between political programs (many of the works being commissioned to legitimate a particular view of war) and the malleability of meaning.  In most weeks, we focus on single or small groups of works, mostly from Europe and the U.S.,  in a variety of media: painting, sculpture, architecture, photography, and graphic arts, taking the opportunity to study them in depth while also gaining exposure to a range of interpretive methods and the richness of the historical context. We also look at the ways works of art themselves become the trophies or stakes of conflict.

Daniel Sherman

Daniel Sherman received his undergraduate degree from Harvard and his Ph.D. from Yale. He came to UNC in 2008 having taught previously at Rice University and the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, where he was also Director of the Center for 21st Century Studies. A specialist in modern art and French cultural history, he has written and edited several books on art museums, the commemoration of World War I in France, and the fascination with so-called primitive cultures in France after World War II; he is now working on the history of archaeology. As a historian who has taught French studies, art history, and general humanities courses, he is committed to discussion and debate across traditional disciplinary boundaries. He enjoys travel, photography, baking, and hanging out with his cats.

 

ARTH 64-001: Picturing Nature

FY Seminar | MWF, 1:25 PM – 2:15 PM | Instructor(s): Maggie Cao

Whether it’s cute animal cams or frightening visualizations of climate change, pictures of nature are both ubiquitous and powerful. This seminar explores the ways in which nature has been collected, displayed, and represented in art, science, and popular culture from the Renaissance to the present. We will explore nature’s many meanings: as curiosity and resource, as playground and lab, and as preserve and wasteland. How have portrayals of nature shaped ideas in the arts and sciences? What is the place of nature imagery now in a time of environmental crisis? Students can expect to experience nature in addition to reading and writing about it. For final projects, students will research and write an op-ed article about picturing nature during uncertain times.

Maggie Cao

Maggie Cao is an art historian who studies the eighteenth and nineteenth century United States. She is an associate professor educated at Harvard. She published one book about American landscape painting and its nineteenth-century demise and is now focused on writing another about painting and imperialism. She has long been interested in historical connections between art and science, the subject of this course. She also happens to be an avid hiker and backpacker in North Carolina and beyond.

 

ARTS 59-001: Time, A Doorway to Visual Expression

FY Seminar | TTH, 3:30 PM – 4:45 PM | Instructor(s): Jim Hirschfield

Alice Walker wrote “Time moves slowly, but passes quickly”. Tennessee Williams wrote, “Time is the longest distance between two places”. Throughout history, time has captivated and inspired artists, writers and musicians. From subtle movements to clearly defined sequences of change, artists will manipulate the element of time to enhance their ideas. “Time, A Doorway to Visual Expression”, considers the concept of time from a variety of perspectives and provides a path to investigate your own notions of time. As a group, we examine this mystifying topic through readings and discussions of Alan Lightman’s Einstein’s Dreams and Leonard Shlain’s Art and Physics. We also watch films, analyze videos and listen to music as we express our personal views through the art making process. As a first-year seminar, the course presumes no previous art experience and students may carry out their projects through a medium of their chossing (e.g., drawing, photography, painting, video, sound, performance and/or sculpture). We will immerse ourselves in the subject of time and create works of art inspired by our personal experiences and increased understanding of Time.

Jim Hirschfield

Jim Hirschfield is a Distinguished Professor in the Department of Art and Art History who began contemplating the experience of time during his travels through the deserts of the southwest in his VW Microbus. He still treasures the experience of travel, which up until the recent pandemic, he did for inspiration, for research, and for adventure. Jim has received a number of art commissions from cities across the country, from Anchorage, Alaska to Fort Lauderdale, Florida and from San Diego, California to Orono, Maine. He has also received numerous awards for his art installations, which he describes as explorations in meditative and ethereal environments that expand our perceptions of time.

 

ASIA 57-001: Dis-Orienting the Orient

FY Seminar | MWF, 1:25 PM – 2:15 PM | Instructor(s): Dwayne Dixon

Examines how the East is constructed as the Orient in different historical periods: 19th-century European colonialism, 1950s to 1960s Hollywood films, contemporary Japanese animation, and the current global war on terrorism.

Dwayne Dixon

Dwayne Dixon’s ethnographic research is focused on several intersecting issues within a broadly imagined Asia: youth culture, city spaces and urban life, media, and body experiences. These various interests coalesce in his work on Japanese young people situated in Tokyo, especially the lives and practices of skateboarders. As an anthropologist, he emphasizes fieldwork methods of extended engagement with his subjects, including the use of ethnographic video to produce visual documents that coincide with the use of video cameras by the young people themselves. His ongoing research into Asian skateboard culture involves studying the global incorporation of young skateboarders into the Olympic structure in preparation for the 2020 Tokyo Summer Games where skateboarding will be included for the first time. Additionally, he is doing research on guns as a prosthetic; investigating the ways training and imagination construct an embodied relationship between the physical perception of perpetual threat as it relates to the immediate environment and the unknown. This research is informed by changes in small arms use and the narratives around them since the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq reshaped the global arms trade and the specific American experience of conflict in Western Asia.

 

ASIA 61-001: India through the Lens of Master Filmmakers

FY Seminar | TTH, 3:30 PM - 4:45 PM and M, 5:45 PM – 8:15 PM (film screenings) | Instructor(s): Pamela Lothspeich

In this course, we watch art films by filmmakers working in various languages and regions of India. Our cinematic journey will touch on important themes in South Asian culture and history over the past 200 years. It will also introduce students to some of the formal elements of filmmaking to help them better “read” and appreciate the text of film. There will be weekly readings on Indian cinema, culture, and film theory. The Monday class is for weekly film screenings, although the Monday class will not meet if the assigned film is available streaming (about half the time).

Pamela Lothspeich

Professor Lothspeich (she/her) teaches courses on Indian literature and culture in the Department of Asian and Middle Eastern Studies and enjoys working with and mentoring students at Carolina. Her research focuses on modern adaptations of the Mahabharata and Ramayana in literature, theatre, and film. Her books include Epic Nation: Reimagining the Mahabharata in the Age of Empire (OUP 2009), and the co-edited volume, Mimetic Desires: Impersonation and Guising across South Asia (University of Hawai‘i Press 2022). Her current book project is on a modern Hindi epic known as The Radheshyam Ramayana and a style of theater called Ramlila which enacts the story of the Ramayana in an annual festival.

 

ASIA 74-001: Imagining Palestine

FY Seminar | TTH, 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM | Instructor(s): Nadia Yaqub

This course explores the idea of Palestine as it is presented in Palestinian writings, films, and other creative works. We will study what Palestine is for the Palestinians, none of whom have lived in a Palestinian state and many of whom have spent more time in exile than in the land that has been known historically as Palestine; how Palestinian relationships to and expectations of Palestine may have changed over time; and how Palestinian portrayals of their dreamed-of homeland have affected our own perceptions of the Palestinian-Israeli conflict and the Arab world generally. How have Palestinian art, film, and literature helped to shape Palestinian identities and aspirations in different ways over the course of modern Palestinian history? In what ways have art, film, and literature intersected with Palestinian politics and a sense of political and personal agency?

Nadia Yaqub

Nadia Yaqub’s research has treated Arab cultural texts ranging from medieval literature and contemporary oral poetry to modern prose fiction and visual culture. Most recently she has focused on Palestinian literature and visual culture. Her current work has focused on two distinct areas: 1) Palestinian cinema and 2) women and transgression in the Arab World. Her most recent books are Palestinian Cinema in the Days of Revolution (2018, University of Texas Press) and Bad Girls of the Arab World (2017, University of Texas Press), a collection she coedited with Dr. Rula Quawas from the University of Jordan.

 

BIOL 103-01F: How Cells Function

FY Launch | TTH, 2:00 PM – 3:15 PM | Instructor(s): Laura Ott

Requisite: Prerequisite, BIOL 101. This class is designed for first- or second-year students beginning their study of biological sciences. The course will cover both biological concepts and scientific competencies necessary for a foundational mastery of genetics, molecular biology, and cellular biology. For biology majors, this is one of the three mandatory fundamentals courses required before taking relevant 200-level core classes and upper-level electives.

Laura Ott

Dr. Laura Ott is a teaching assistant professor in the Department of Biology. She has a B.S. in microbiology from Michigan State University and a Ph.D. in immunology from North Carolina State University. She is broadly trained as a cell and molecular biologist and teaches BIOL 101, BIOL 103, BIOL 202, BIOL 252, BIOL 295, BIOL 395, and BIOL 448. For the past 8 years, her research has focused on the scholarship of teaching and learning, where she investigates innovative curricular and co-curricular activities to promote the success of diverse students in STEM.

 

BIOL 104-01F: Biodiversity

FY Launch | MWF, 1:25 PM – 2:15 PM | Instructor(s): Mara Evans

Requisites: Prerequisites, BIOL 101 and 101L. The biological diversity we see on Earth today encompasses a variety of genetic, species, and ecosystem level variation. This course will focus on the biological principles that push biologists to understand what produces and sustains the biodiversity of life on Earth. This class will address key questions about how we identify and measure biological diversity, how it changes over time, and why biological diversity matters as our planet continues to change.

Mara Evans

 

BIOL 53-001: Biotechnology: Genetically Modified Foods to the Sequence of the Human Genome

FY Seminar | TTH, 12:30 PM – 1:45 PM | Instructor(s): Jill Dowen

A good life depends on access to adequate food and medical care. Advances in biotechnology have made possible both agriculture and medicine, and further advances may allow us to feed and keep healthy a burgeoning population in both developed and undeveloped countries. This seminar will examine the science behind a number of striking recent advances in biology, including animal cloning, genetic engineering of crop plants, development of new therapeutic drugs, development of embryonic stem cells, and deciphering of the complete human genome sequence. Students will debate how specific technological advances force us to confront new social and ethical choices, such as whether you want your own genome to be sequenced. We will also consider how new technologies are actually implemented, especially in regard to recent public health challenges such as Zika and SARS-CoV-2 viruses. The seminar should bring together the humanistic and technical impulses in students, and is open to students planning careers in scientific or humanities fields.

Jill Dowen

Jill Dowen, PhD, is a member of the UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, the Integrative Program in Biological and Genome Sciences, and an Assistant Professor in the Biochemistry and Biophysics Department and the Biology Department at UNC-Chapel Hill. Dr. Dowen’s lab is investigating the function of DNA loops involving genes and their regulatory elements. Projects in her lab address how genome organization impacts the expression of genes in different cell types during development and how disruptions in these mechanisms lead to human diseases such as cancers and developmental syndromes.

 

BIOL 89-001: Biodiversity and Citizen Science

FY Seminar | TTH, 12:30 PM – 1:45 PM | Instructor(s): Allen Hurlbert

In this course you will learn about the biodiversity around us, and the discipline of citizen science as a means to understanding more about that biodiversity. Citizen science is the public generation of scientific knowledge, and in this era of mobile technology and artificial intelligence, non-expert members of the public are providing millions of biodiversity observations each year. We will learn about the promise of citizen science for answering important questions in biodiversity science, we will contribute our own observations to citizen science databases, and we will learn how to make and interpret graphs and figures using citizen science data.

Allen Hurlbert

My research seeks to understand the ecological and evolutionary processes underlying broad-scale patterns of distribution, abundance and diversity across the globe, and how that biodiversity is expected to respond to ongoing environmental change. I enjoy observing the natural world (especially birds and bugs), but also figuring out how to best analyze data to yield the most important insights. I hope my students grow in both of those areas!

 

CHEM 89-001: Polymers: How Plastic Changed Our World

FY Seminar | TTH, 9:30 AM – 10:45 AM | Instructor(s): Danielle Zurcher

From milk bottles and grocery bags to contact lenses and diapers, polymers influence nearly every aspect of our daily lives. Through hands-on activities, readings, and interactive lessons, we will examine the role polymers have played, both positive and negative, on our society and world. The course will start with a general chemistry background in chemical structure. Then we will examine the impact of common plastics before exploring how polymers have influenced specific fields, including parts fabrication (e.g. 3D printing), dentistry, and electronics. During the course, students will have the opportunity to create their own biodegradable plastic as well as practice science communication through two separate projects: creating a stop-motion animation video and a 30-min group presentation.

Danielle Zurcher

Dr. Danielle Zurcher is a Teaching Assistant Professor at UNC in the chemistry department. Her training has been at the intersection of polymer and organic chemistry to design and improve novel materials for sensing toxic water contaminants. Her current interests lie in implementing effective teaching methods that promote student engagement and develop their critical thinking skills in large introductory courses. Dr. Zurcher is continually searching for new ways to connect students with chemistry and the new ways in which polymers are being used in our lives offer many great examples.

 

CLAS 67-001: Helen of Troy: From Homer to Hollywood

FY Seminar | TTH, 9:30 AM – 10:45 AM | Instructor(s): Patricia Rosenmeyer

Helen of Troy is said to have been the most beautiful woman in the world, yet we have no evidence of what she really looked like. This missing piece has worked in her favor, as authors and artists have tried to “fill in the blank” ever since. For over two millennia, her story has inspired countless creative responses, from Homer’s Iliad to Hollywood’s Troy. Helen makes us think about issues that still resonate today: how do we define beauty? what is worth fighting for? how far should one go for love? In this course, we will study the story of Helen in multiple retellings, asking questions about the value of beauty, the risks of desire, and the consequences for society when individuals place love above all else. Students will read ancient and modern sources, analyze and debate them, and write about the issues. The course requires no prior knowledge of the material.

Patricia Rosenmeyer

Professor Patricia Rosenmeyer has degrees in Classics from Harvard (B.A.), Cambridge (M.A.), and Princeton (Ph.D.). She taught at Michigan, Yale, and Wisconsin, before accepting the Paddison Chair of Classics at UNC-Chapel Hill in fall 2017. Prof. Rosenmeyer pursues a range of scholarly interests in ancient Greek literature, and has published four books and one edited volume. She has received fellowships from ACLS, NEH, the Mellon Foundation, and the Loeb Library. Her current research focuses on Homer, Sappho, reception studies, and translation strategies in early 20th-century Europe. She is eager to share her fascination with Helen of Troy with interested students.

 

CMPL 55-001: Comics as Literature

FY Seminar | TTH, 2:00 PM – 3:15 PM | Instructor(s): Elyse Crystall

Is it possible that people across generations and geographies see differently? What if what we see is related to who we are and our cultural beliefs? These are among the questions we will explore in this class on visual literacy and comics (in the form of adult graphic novels). We will question how meaning is made through the juxtaposition and framing of images as well as the relationship between words and images. In the process of comparing images, visual patterns emerge that enable the reader to identify artistic techniques and strategies that attempt to convey meaning where words might fail. We will work to sharpen our critical thinking (and reading) skills and reflect on how seeing is a socially and culturally circumscribed phenomenon. Creating a graphic narrative and a podcast about graphic novels are two projects we will undertake.

Elyse Crystall

Dr. Elyse Crystall has been teaching courses on visual literacy – including graphic novels, comics, and film – and topics such as racism, anti-Semitism, and Islamophobia; (im)migration and borders; race, ethnicity, gender, class, sexuality, and nationality; memory and trauma; and conquest, imperialism, colonialism, and empire for 25 years. Her role as the coordinator of social justice concentration for the English undergraduate major links to her commitment to social justice issues; her understanding of the critical importance of historical context; and her belief that race, ethnicity, class, gender, nationality, sexuality, among others, are both identity categories and social locations that shape how we see the world — and how the world sees us. Nothing is more gratifying to Dr. Crystall than when a group of students, an instructor, the texts assigned in the course, and the world outside the classroom work together to create meaning — new possibilities, new questions, and new ways of seeing.

 

COMM 82-001: Food Politics from an Organizational Communication Perspective

FY Seminar | TTH, 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM | Instructor(s): Sarah Dempsey

The globalization of food systems is both a hotly contested subject and a central part of contemporary life. This course provides an applied introduction to key debates by adopting a critical organizational communication lens on our globalized food system. Drawing on readings, popular media texts, discussions, and experiential activities, we will explore food system labor practices, the role of multinational companies and global commodity chains, the status of hunger and food deserts, the role of food marketing and consumption practices, and the growth of local and sustainable movements devoted to food justice. Throughout, we investigate how our global food system is shaped by different types of organizations operating within particular locales, such as North Carolina, USA.

This is an APPLES-designated service-learning course that requires service hours. In addition to experiential field activities and visits, our course is organized around group-based engaged research projects. Your success will depend upon your ability to work independently and practice collective leadership. This project will increase your research and writing skills, sharpen your leadership and collaborative skills, and provide you with applied insight into the themes of the course.

Sarah Dempsey

Sarah Dempsey is an Associate Professor in the Department of Communication. Her research focuses on critical theories of work and professional life and the politics of voice, representation, and accountability in social change efforts. Her most recent research examines cultural discourses about work and labor in the context of the food industry. She is currently engaged in a book length project drawing on archival research, critical analysis of popular discourses and corporate practices, and interviews with contemporary food service workers, organizers, and living wage and fair wage advocates and business owners.

 

COMM 89-001: Communication, Culture, and Social Justice

FY Seminar | MW, 5:45 PM – 7:00 PM | Instructor(s): Michael Palm

This course introduces students to several primary areas of focus for social justice-oriented scholarship and activism. These areas include racial justice, labor and economic justice, gender and sexual justice, and environmental justice. The course will also introduce students to ways that these issues are studied in the Department of Communication at UNC, by paying particular attention to popular culture and public engagement as sites of struggles for social justice.

Michael Palm

Michael Palm’s teaching focuses on the history of everyday technology and the politics and economics of popular culture. He’s writing a book about the contemporary economy for vinyl records. Informed by research visits to pressing plants and (lots) of record stores, the book connects vinyl's niche popularity to issues including ecological sustainability, gentrification, and independent cultural production in a digital media landscape. Palm’s book Technologies of Consumer Labor: A History of Self-Service (Routledge, 2017) documents and analyzes the history of telephone interface—from the rotary dial to the keypad to the touch screen—as self-service technology.

 

COMM 89-002: Researching Society and Culture

FY Seminar | TTH, 2:00 PM – 3:15 PM | Instructor(s): Torin Monahan

Qualitative research offers an exciting way to discover the world. There are so many unknowns about why people do the things they do, what is meaningful in people’s lives, how conflicts arise or are resolved, how technologies shape possibilities, how symbols acquire meaning, and how social change occurs. Whereas we all have ready-made “frames” that provide us with hunches about why things are the way they are, the task of the researcher is to ask good questions and then seek answers, all the while being open to—and eagerly pursuing—surprises. This intellectual posture of genuine curiosity is what animates some of the best research. This is the kind of research you will learn about and will conduct yourself in this course.

Torin Monahan

I am an interdisciplinary scholar who thoroughly enjoys conducting empirical research. I’ve studied hospitals, schools, Department of Homeland Security counterterrorism centers, and most recently digital platform companies (e.g., Uber, Airbnb). I also have wide experience in evaluating research proposals for funding agencies such as the U.S. National Science Foundation, the U.S. National Institutes of Health, the U.K. Economic and Social Research Council, the European Science Foundation, and many more. I routinely draw upon this background to mentor students and help them maximize the success of their research projects. My specialty area is in media and technology studies.

 

DRAM 83-001: Spectacle in the Theatre

FY Seminar | TTH, 9:30 AM – 10:45 AM | Instructor(s): David Navalinsky

This seminar will explore the artists, art and technology involved in creating the world of the play. It is intended as an overview for students who want to learn about theatrical design. Students will create their own designs in the areas of scenery, costumes, and lighting for three plays throughout the semester. The plays will be placed outside of their traditional setting while still maintaining the story and themes. Students have placed Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream in a trailer park and a daycare center for example. Careful historical research, close reading and analysis, text and source material, and collaboration will be the focus of the student projects.

David Navalinsky

David Navalinsky is the Director of Undergraduate Production in the Department of Dramatic Art. David has taught at the University of Texas at Arlington and the University of Mississippi. David’s recent design work includes scenery for The Uncanny Valley by Francesca Talenti. The Uncanny Valley featured a Robothespian™, which is exactly what it sounds like. He has also written a documentary theatre piece Priceless Gem: An Athlete Story, which tells the stories of UNC athletes. David has worked professionally at South Coast Repertory in Orange County California, The Utah Shakespeare Festival, The Illinois Shakespeare Festival, and the Karamu Performing Arts Theatre in Cleveland, OH. Some of David’s favorite projects were at the Dallas Children’s Theater where he made a dinosaur collapse and pirates walk the plank.

 

DRAM 87-001: Style: A Mode of Expression

FY Seminar | TTH, 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM | Instructor(s): McKay Coble

This seminar studies the elements of design in their pure form and in context, surveys a history of period styles and theatre, and identifies their causes. Consider Oscar Wilde’s statement from The Decay of Living 1889:

“Life imitates Art far more than Art imitates Life. This results not merely from Life’s imitative instincts, but from the fact that the self conscious aim of Life is to find expression, and that Art offers it certain beautiful forms through which it may realize that energy…”

Do you agree or disagree?

Art and design have frequently shown the inner life of humankind throughout history better than political, intellectual or social history. While a period’s style is seldom defined by the everyday choices of everyday people and is most often recorded in the works of artists, writers and intellectuals we must recognize the “times” as a major motivator for all stylistic choices. Even minor arts reflect major events.

We will study the elements of design as they exist in their pure form; a “tool box” of elements available to artists and practice the principles to which design is bound.
We will survey a history of period styles, period theatre and identify their causes.
We will explore one period’s style as a foundation for the next and dispel the Star Trek premise that future styles will only reflect the future.

McKay Coble

McKay Coble teaches design, both scenic and costume for the theatre and the history of material culture. She fell in love with the power of choice as far as visuals are concerned early in her career as a Carolina student and have never turned back. She is a professor in the Department of Dramatic Art and is a resident designer for PlayMakers Repertory Company. Dr. Coble uses the many and varied artistic venues on campus as co-instructors and the class will be visiting them during the course of the semester. Students will likely join her on a design journey as she created the scenery for a production for PRC. Students will have the opportunity to see the process and product.

 

ECON 101H-01F: Introduction to Economics

FY Launch | TTH, 9:30 AM – 10:45 AM | Instructor(s): Sergio Parreiras | Lab/Recitation: ECON 101H-601

Introduction to fundamental issues in economics including competition, scarcity, opportunity cost, resource allocation, unemployment, inflation, and the determination of prices.

Sergio Parreiras

Professor Parreiras has broad research interests in economics of information and game theory. His most recent research has concentrated on auctions and mechanism design. His recent publications include papers in the Journal of Economic Theory and Games and Economic Behavior.

 

ECON 58H-001: Researching the Tools for Success in College

FY Seminar | TTH, 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM | Instructor(s): Jane Cooley Fruehwirth

In this Course-based Undergraduate Research Experience (CURE), we will study the barriers and tools for success in college. Students will develop a measure of success and identify a focal barrier to success in collaboration with classmates and drawing on existing research. Students will synthesize existing evidence in the related literature, collect their own data and create their own evidence on the topic.

Jane Cooley Fruehwirth

Jane Cooley Fruehwirth is an economist with research interests in the determinants of social, economic and racial inequality. A central theme to her research is the role of social context in shaping disadvantage, particularly in the context of schools and friendships. She studies education policies that are aimed at improving disadvantaged students' outcomes, such as teaching practice, accountability and grade retention. More recently, her research delves into the determinants of mental health in adolescence. She is now teaming up with undergraduate researchers to help tackle the mental health crisis on college campuses.

 

ENEC 201-01F: Introduction to Environment and Society

FY Launch | MWF, 10:10 AM – 11:00 AM | Instructor(s): Gregory Gangi | Lab/Recitation: ENEC 201-735 or ENEC 201-736

Human-environment interactions are examined through analytical methods from the social sciences, humanities, and sciences. The focus is on the role of social, political, and economic factors in controlling interactions between society and the environment in historical and cultural contexts. Three lecture hours and one recitation hour a week.

Gregory Gangi

In his teaching, Greg Gangi conveys a complex understanding of environmental challenges and explores innovative solutions. His teaching extends beyond the classroom as he leads students to many countries to learn firsthand about global change and innovation. He organized several educational trips to Germany, the Netherlands and the Nordic nations. Given the role that South Korea and China play in shaping the future of technology, he plans to guide students in learning from these two nations during the summer of 2019.

Gangi received various awards at UNC and a national award for his advising and mentoring of students. In 2014, he was awarded the NACADA Award for Outstanding Faculty Advisor. He received the Tanner Award for Teaching Excellence in 2010 and the University recognized him with the Massey Award for Outstanding Service in 2018.

In addition to his teaching, Gangi works to create networks in North Carolina between industry, academia, and government to help strengthen innovation. He also seeks to foster international networks that connect companies in the Clean Tech sector with North Carolina. He defines clean technology broadly to include companies in clean energy, smart cities, water technologies, innovations to make transportation more sustainable, building technologies and solutions that improve food security and agricultural sustainability. He is the lead organizer of the annual UNC Clean Tech Summit, which represents the largest event of its kind in the southeastern region of the United States.

 

ENEC 89-001: How Green are We? Examining Sustainability at UNC

FY Seminar | TTH, 2:00 PM – 3:15 PM | Instructor(s): Amy Cooke

How sustainable is our university? Cities around the world face issues of environmental degradation, congested traffic, poor water supplies, sanitation concerns, poor energy delivery and waste management. A research university is analogous to a small city, where we can both investigate and more easily implement sustainable technologies and practices. In this class we will examine the sustainability concerns of the modern university, going “back of the house” around UNC—how green is our energy? Our food? Our water? How do we handle waste across these inputs? We will examine how sustainability is measured and improved, comparing our institution’s progress to other similar schools, and ask ourselves both where we can do better and how we can convince the system to make it happen.

Amy Cooke

Amy Cooke is fascinated by the intersection of environmental science and everyday life. This fascination led her to wander around the world asking people about their food, water supplies, clothing and shelter, from the Galapagos Islands to the Serengeti Plains. Here at UNC, she has worked closely with both Edible Campus and the sustainable food purchasing project in the dining halls and loves to take students 'backstage' around campus.

 

ENGL 57H-001: Future Perfect: Science Fictions and Social Form

FY Seminar | TTH, 12:30 PM – 1:45 PM | Instructor(s): Matthew Taylor

What will our world look like in ten years? Fifty? One hundred? Will the future be a utopian paradise or a dystopian wasteland? Through a wide-ranging survey of popular science writing, novels, and films, this first year seminar will examine fictional and nonfictional attempts to imagine the future from the nineteenth century to the present. We will explore everything from futurology and transhumanism to warnings of imminent environmental collapse. Our focus will be less on assessing the accuracy of these predictions and more on determining what they tell us about the hopes and fears of the times in which they were made. The course will culminate in a short research paper on a future-oriented topic of your choosing.

Matthew Taylor

Matthew Taylor’s research focuses on the intersections among environmental humanities, critical theory (including posthumanism, biopolitics, science and technology studies, and critical race theory), and nineteenth- and twentieth-century American literature. His first book, Universes without Us: Posthuman Cosmologies in American Literature (Univ. of Minnesota Press), examines cosmologies that challenge the utopianism of both past and present attempts at fusing self and environment.

 

ENGL 70-001: Courtly Love, Then and Now

FY Seminar | TTH, 3:30 PM – 4:45 PM | Instructor(s): David J. Baker

How have ideas about courtship changed between the twelfth century and today? Just what was “courtly love”? And how has it influenced our own views of romance? Our readings will include literature that defined this influential concept, from medieval Arthurian romances to Renaissance sonnets and Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet. We will trace the influence of these traditions on twentieth-century films such as The Philadelphia Story, and on our popular culture now. In the process, we will explore the history of Western thought about gender relations, and the political and economic implications of our ideas about beauty, sex, and love.

David J. Baker

David J. Baker is Peter G. Phialas Professor in the Department of English and Comparative Literature at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He is the author of Between Nations: Shakespeare, Spenser, Marvell and the Question of Britain (1997) and On Demand: Writing for the Market in Early Modern England (2010). With Willy Maley, he is the co-editor of British Identity and English Renaissance Literature (2002) and, with Patricia Palmer, Early Modern Criticism in a Time of Crisis (2022). In 2021, he was a Fulbright fellow in Ireland.

 

ENGL 71H-001: Doctors and Patients

FY Seminar | MWF, 11:15 AM – 12:05 PM | Instructor(s): Kym Weed

When medical anthropologist Arthur Kleinman writes that “illness has meaning,” he reminds us that the human experience of being sick involves more than bodily symptoms. Moreover, the effects of illness and disability are rarely confined to one person. In this course, we will analyze a diverse collection of writers who have taken as their topic the human struggle to make sense of suffering and debility through a range of genres including fiction, non-fiction, graphic memoir, podcasts, and oral histories. Divided into five units, the course will allow us to explore not just the medical, but also the personal, ethical, cultural, and political facets of illness from the perspectives of patients, healers, and families. Central texts will include works by Abby Norman, Damon Tweedy, Brian Fies, and Lulu Wang. Additionally, students will explore a set of oral histories from the Stories to Save Lives project to learn more about the experiences of patients, healers, and families from across North Carolina.

Kym Weed

Kym Weed is a Teaching Assistant Professor in English & Comparative Literature and the Co-Director of the HHIVE Lab and Associate Director of graduate programs in Literature, Medicine, and Culture. She earned her PhD from UNC and returned to Chapel Hill after a year in Vanderbilt University’s Center for Medicine, Health, and Society. Her research focuses on the intersection of science and literature in late-nineteenth-century American literature and culture as well as historical and contemporary understandings of illness, health, disability, and embodiment. She teaches courses in health humanities, disability studies, American literature, and writing.

 

ENGL 89-001: The Rhetoric of Wellness

FY Seminar | MWF, 10:10 AM – 11:00 AM | Instructor(s): Daniel Anderson

Scan any bookstore shelf and you’d think the human psyche is hanging on by a thread. From fighting anxiety to seeking happiness to putting an end to procrastination, the titles compete for the opportunity to fix our problems with the promise of self-improvement. But are we really in worse psychological shape than those who have come before us? And how would we begin to study the status of our wellness? This first-year seminar will offer one approach to exploring these and related questions: studying the rhetoric of self-help. Rhetoric provides a lens for thinking about the ways people talk about self-help. This lens will drive the organization of the course. Studying the language in online self-help discourse, for instance, will enable extensive research activities. Students will learn to collect a corpus of Tweet data, and then use grounded theory and qualitative approaches to study the conversation. Using mixed methods, they will then quantify interpretations and develop visuals to recognize patterns. In addition to working with contemporary online discourse, students will explore texts with historical instantiations of self-help rhetoric—from classical instruction linked with civics and oration to medieval meditations to 1960s and 70s self-actualization to modern mindfulness. Rhetorical study will also facilitate the production of knowledge as students translate their understanding into communication to be shared publicly. The class activities will feature the creation of texts in a range of media. Students will produce print reports, visual memes, and PSA video projects. Students will also explore oral communication through the creation of podcasts. The combination of mixed methods research and public communication will drive the class. Teaching methods will tap into this dynamic by augmenting lecture and discussion with hands-on activities, collaboration, and the drafting and revision of projects.

Daniel Anderson

Daniel Anderson is a Professor in the Department of English & Comparative Literature. He is the Director of the University Writing Program. He is also Director the Digital Innovation Lab, where he leads campus digital humanities initiatives. He studies digital rhetoric, digital humanities, humanities data studies, teaching with technology, and alternative approaches to scholarship. His books include Video Scholarship and Screen Composing, Write Now, Connections: A Guide to Online Writing, Writing About Literature in the Media Age, and Beyond Words: Reading and Writing in a Digital Age. He also creates new media performance art and scholarship using the computer screen as a composing space. More information can be found at https://iamdan.org.

 

ENGL 89H-001: The Machine Mistake from Frankenstein to the Smartphone 

FY Seminar | MWF, 10:10 AM – 11:00 AM | Instructor(s): David Ross

There is the assumption that science fiction propagandizes for the gleaming gadgetry that it depicts. It’s true that science fiction often endorses the scientific endeavor and worldview. It’s further true that the science fictionists of the 1940s and 1950s tended to pine for the space age that began in 1969. But even at its giddiest and wonkiest, science fiction remembers the lesson of Frankenstein. It remembers that our monsters develop ideas of their own; that they wind up haunting us and even hunting us; that our innovations—however seemingly benign—however fenced and fail-safe—threaten to escape our control and our comprehension. This course traces the genealogy of this machine anxiety. Our guiding questions will be: What are machines? Does the artificially intelligent “machine” cease to be a machine? Are machines “natural” or “unnatural”? Are they heretical? Are their dangers inherent? How do they change us?

Our course epigraph might paraphrase Winston Churchill: We shape our machines; thereafter they shape us.

David Ross

David A. Ross is a graduate of Yale and Oxford. He has been a member of the Department of English & Comparative Literature at UNC–Chapel Hill since 2002. He is the author of A Critical Companion to William Butler Yeats (2009) and the co-editor/co-translator of The Search for the Avant-Garde, 1946–1969 (2012), the descriptive catalogue of the Taipei Fine Arts Museum. A collector and amateur scholar of traditional Chinese paintings and Japanese woodblock prints, he has served as president of Southeast Conference of the Association for Asian Studies and as both editor and book review editor of the Southeast Review of Asian Studies.

 

EXSS 175-02F: Human Anatomy

FY Launch | TTH, 2:00 PM – 3:15 PM | Instructor(s): Benjamin Goerger

The study of the structure of the human body with special emphasis on the musculoskeletal, articular, and nervous systems. Prosected cadaver materials are utilized to study the skeletal muscles and body viscera.

Benjamin Goerger

 

EXSS 55-001: Sport Engineering and Human Performance

FY Seminar | MWF, 9:05 AM – 9:55 AM | Instructor(s): Meredith Petschauer

This first year seminar designed to discuss the limits of human performance and equipment that is engineered to enhance performance. How fast is it possible to run or swim? Will Olympic records continue to be broken? When do we reach our full athletic potential? This course is designed to challenge your thinking about performance using the science that governs biomechanics and human physiology as well as exploring the data that drives equipment development.

Meredith Petschauer

Meredith Petschauer received her PhD from the University of North Carolina-Greensboro in Biomechanics, Master’s degree from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in Athletic Training and bachelor’s degree from The College of Wooster. She teaches Biomechanics, Advanced Orthopedic Assessment and Functional Anatomy. She is the Director of Undergraduate Studies for EXSS and serves as the Athletic Trainer for the Women’s Volleyball team. Her clinical focus is what lead her into biomechanics and human performance. Her research interest includes emergency care of the equipment laden athlete. She and her husband, Greg have two children, Madison and Grant.

 

GEOG 130-01F: Development and Inequality: Global Perspectives

FY Launch | MWF, 1:25 PM – 2:15 PM | Instructor(s): Jonathan Lepofsky

An introduction to historical and contemporary ideas about practices and meanings of development. Students will explore “development” in a global landscape of poverty, power, and struggles over inequality.

Jonathan Lepofsky

 

GEOG 62-001: The Culture of Technology

FY Seminar | TTH, 3:30 PM – 4:45 PM | Instructor(s): Scott Kirsch

This seminar uses the lens of culture to explore the codes of meaning and values, and relations of social power, that are ‘hard-wired’ in our technologies. Focusing on reflections of technology in film, art, literature, media, and built environments, while introducing students to interdisciplinary cultural studies of technology and human geography perspectives, the course encourages critical thinking and writing about the place of technology in past, present, and future worlds.

Scott Kirsch

Scott Kirsch is a cultural, historical, and political geographer in the Geography Department at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, where he has been teaching since the start of the third millennium. He writes about social and political implications of technology; 19th & 20th century US science; history of scientific exploration and cartography; nuclear landscapes; US geopolitics, especially in Philippines and Asia/Pacific; and geographies of war and peace.

 

GEOG 67-001: Politics of Everyday Life

FY Seminar | MWF, 11:15 AM – 12:05 PM | Instructor(s): Sara Smith

This seminar examines the ways that politics, especially contests over territory, are part of our day-to-day life. We will explore a range of cases, from immigration policy and rhetoric in the US, to popular representations of geopolitics in film, to the politics of family planning in India. How do questions of love, friendship, family and youth identity tie into the international and national political stories that we see on the news? What does national identity have to do with our individual sense of self? We will also explore alternative ways that international politics have been studied, as feminist geopolitics or anti-geopolitics and questions of citizenship. Work for the seminar will involve original research on intersections of international politics and students’ daily life, as well as exploring representations of geopolitical issues in the media, film and fiction.

Sara Smith

Sara Smith is a political geographer with a South Asia focus, specializing in feminist political geography and political geographies of youth and the future. She has been involved in non-profit work and research in India since 1999. Her Ph.D. is in geography, and she has been teaching in UNC’s Department of Geography since 2009. Professor Smith’s current research in the Ladakh region of India’s Jammu and Kashmir State addresses the ways that individuals’ personal lives (especially their decisions about love and babies) are entangled in territorial struggle. Smith is developing a new project about how marginalized young people from India’s remote mountain regions experience university life in major Indian cities and how this shapes their politics. If you are curious, you can find out more about this work on her faculty website: https://sarasmith.web.unc.edu/.

 

GEOG 89-001: Freshwaters in the Anthropocene

FY Seminar | TTH, 9:30 AM – 10:45 AM | Instructor(s): Amanda DelVecchia

Freshwaters sustain myriad ecosystem services by providing drinking water, irrigation, inland fisheries, transportation, recreational opportunities, nutrient cycling, and biodiversity. At the same time, both water quality and quantity are impacted by land use, water abstraction, damming, contamination, and climate change. This seminar will focus (1) on understanding how these anthropogenic pressures affect freshwater ecosystems differently across ecoregions, and (2) how management, legislative, and social initiatives have adapted or developed solutions. We will focus mainly on the United States but consider case studies from around the world. Students should be prepared to read and discuss three materials per week. These reading materials will include a range of popular media including podcasts, newspaper articles, and book chapters, as well as scientific articles and overviews. We will also spend some time exploring and talking about streams accessible to the UNC campus. Class will culminate with research projects in which students get to explore a topic of their choice and presenting findings to their peers.

Amanda DelVecchia

I am a physical geographer focusing on freshwater ecosystem ecology and biogeochemistry. This involves connecting various spatial and temporal scales, and biotic and abiotic factors, within groundwater, lakes, wetlands, rivers, and their watersheds. In particular, I ask how connectivity between different parts of the landscape (including those we cannot see!), and over time, affect functions like carbon and nutrient cycling, food webs, and greenhouse gas dynamics. By understanding these connections, we can better predict how freshwaters react to climate change and anthropogenic alteration, so that we may better protect freshwater biodiversity and function. I use a mix of empirical and data science, and work across the U.S. and internationally. You can learn more about my research by visiting my website at amandadelvecchia.weebly.com, by emailing me, or by visiting during my office hours, in which case I can promise you a warm reception and an offer for tea.

 

GLBL 221-01F: The Migratory Experience

FY Launch | TTH, 9:30 AM – 10:45 AM | Instructor(s): Carmen Huerta-Bapat

This course presents a critical analysis of the migrant experience in North America and Europe. In addition to examining theoretical explanations for migration, this course will ensure that students develop a deep, personal, and practical appreciation of migration rooted in a social justice framework. To do so, we will utilize storytelling, documentaries, and my own firsthand lived experiences as a Latina immigrant. By the end of the course, students will:
• Develop a clear understanding of the theories driving migration and the various motivations (forced or voluntary) of individuals embarking in this journey.
• Become familiarized with the policies implemented by sending and receiving countries.
• Understand the reception and backlash migrants face.
• Assess whether media portrayals of immigrants via shows such as TLC’s 90 Day Fiancé accurately represent the empirical reality of the migratory experience.

Carmen Huerta-Bapat

Carmen Huerta-Bapat holds a PhD in sociology from the University of North Carolina – Chapel Hill, an MA in sociology from the University of North Carolina – Chapel Hill, and an MA in political science from Rice University. She proudly ‘sampled’ multiple PhD programs before settling on sociology, which gives her a multi-faceted understanding of how knowledge is generated, as well as various methodological techniques. Her current research takes an interdisciplinary approach to understanding how institutions work to incorporate underrepresented racial and ethnic groups, with a particular focus on immigrant communities. Specifically, her work examines how schools, universities, and police agencies react to the arrival of new migrant communities. She is currently pursuing projects that examine police behavior toward Latino immigrants in North Carolina, the social and health impacts associated with persecutory immigration policies, the negative impacts of microaggressions on first-generation college students, and parental involvement of Latino families in public education. Dr. Huerta-Bapat is currently drawing on her social science training and lived experience as a Latina immigrant in a project with the School of Public Health at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill. Her work aims to design health interventions with marginalized communities to ensure that these actions are grounded in mutual understanding and respect.

 

GSLL 59-001: Moscow 1937: Dictatorships and Their Defenders

FY Seminar | TTH, 2:00 PM – 3:15 PM | Instructor(s): David Pike

This seminar deals in the broadest possible context with two critical issues that dominated the 20th century: the rise of fascism out of the carnage of World War I and the Bolshevik revolution to which the war and Czarist Russia’s involvement in it helped contribute. As the semester unfolds, drawing on a variety of historical and documentary films, and literature (memoirs, novels), we will take a comparative look at singular personalities like Lenin, Stalin, and Hitler and examine the role played by such key figures in historical events of this magnitude. Towards the end of the semester, we will glance briefly at the situation created in Western and Eastern Europe by the defeat of fascism and contemplate the origins and evolution of the cold war. We will conclude the seminar with a consideration of the dissolution and democratization of Eastern European countries, the collapse of the Soviet Union, and, against the tragic background of the past, the general prognosis for democracy in the future.

David Pike

David Pike received his Ph.D. from Stanford University in 1978 in German Studies with a minor in Russian and has taught at UNC–CH since 1980. He is the author of three books, The Politics of Culture in Soviet -Occupied Germany, 1945-1949 (1993), Lukács and Brecht (1985), and German Writers in Soviet Exile, 1933-1945 (1982). His research takes him regularly to Berlin and Moscow.

 

HIST 53-001: Traveling to European Cities: American Writers/Cultural Identities, 1830-2000

FY Seminar | TTH, 11:00 AM – 12:30 PM | Instructor(s): Lloyd Kramer

This seminar examines two key themes in modern cultural and intellectual history: the importance of travel in the lives and cultural identities of American writers and the important role of European cities in the evolution of modern American cultural identities. We shall focus on a historical era in which American writers were especially drawn to Europe as an alternative to the social and cultural life in the United States; and we’ll discuss how the encounter with Europe influenced these writers as they defined their national identities as well as their views of politics, social relations, gender identities, literature, art and European cultural traditions. The seminar explores how travel has become one of the most influential personal experiences in modern times; and we’ll conclude the course with discussions of how travel remained important for American writers at the end of the twentieth century. Our overall goal is to analyze the connection between travel, writing, and personal identities. This is a class for people who like to read about personal experiences and are intrigued by foreign travel. The assigned texts include works by women and men such as Margaret Fuller, David Dorr, Mark Twain, Henry James, Gertrude Stein, Ernest Hemingway, Henry Miller James Baldwin, Elizabeth Spencer, and David Sedaris; and we’ll focus on works that convey how writers have interpreted American experiences in European cities such as Paris, London, Rome, and Athens.

Lloyd Kramer

Lloyd Kramer’s interests focus on Modern European History with an emphasis on nineteenth-century France and French-American cultural relations. He is particularly interested in historical processes that shape personal and collective identities, including the experiences of cross-cultural exchange and the emergence of modern nationalism. Other research and teaching interests deal with the roles of intellectuals in modern societies and the theoretical foundations of historical knowledge. His teaching stresses the pleasures of reading, discussing and writing about influential books in various eras of European and world history.

 

HIST 63H-001: Water, Conflict, and Connection: the Middle East and Ottoman Lands

FY Seminar | MWF, 3:35 PM – 5:00 PM | Instructor(s): Sarah Shields

Despite its centrality for the lives and the livelihoods of people in the Middle East, water has seldom been examined in its own right as a contributing factor to its history. This new First Year Seminar will explore the many ways in which water has shaped the history of the region, and the effects it currently has on life in the Middle East.

Along the Mediterranean and Aegean coasts as well as the Red Sea and Arab/Persian Gulf, seafaring and fishing played important roles in the economy; in the Gulf, pearl-diving became an important local industry as well. Agricultural innovations allowed permanent settlement in areas with little rainfall. Rivers and seas were essential for transportation, connecting populations of far-flung parts of the Middle East with each other, facilitating commerce and pilgrimage. The availability of clean water has become an increasing problem as industrialization and consumerism soil beaches and sully the region’s drinking supplies. Water and conflict have been indivisible in the region, since water is one of the crucial and rare resources in the Middle East. Some have argued, for example, that the conflict between Israel and the Palestinians can only be resolved by taking water resources into account; others have pointed to recent drought in Syria as a major factor contributing to the uprising that began in 2011. This course will focus in turn on the historical, cultural, and contemporary issues surrounding the presence and absence of water in the Middle East.

Sarah Shields

Sarah Shields has been at UNC for decades, and both of her children have graduated wearing Tar Heel blue. She teaches courses on the modern Middle East, the conflict over Israel/Palestine, the history of Iraq, and a variety of courses on water in the Middle East. Her current research is on the Middle East and the establishment of borders after World War I. She has enjoyed teaching at UNC so much that she has even accompanied UNC students to programs in Turkey and England.

 

HIST 72-001: Women's Voices: 20th-Century European History in Female Memory

FY Seminar | TTH, 12:30 PM – 1:45 PM | Instructor(s): Karen Hagemann

The seminar examines twentieth century European history through the lens of women’s autobiographical writings. It explores women’s voices from different generational, social and national backgrounds. We will read and discuss autobiographical texts by six women, who grew up in middle class families in Austria, Britain, France and Germany and wrote about their lives in the first half of the twentieth century. They all tried to make a difference in society and politics: Emmeline Pankhurst (1958-1928), a leader of the militant British suffragette movement; Alice Salomon (1872-1948), a liberal Jewish-German social reformer and activist of the German middle class women’s movement; Vera Brittain (1893-1970), a British volunteer nurse during World War I, who became after the war a peace activist and writer; Toni Sender (1888-1964), a German-Jewish socialist and one of the first female parliamentarians in Weimar Germany, who like Salomon after the Nazi’s takeover in 1933 had to flee Germany; Genevieve De Gaulle-Anthonioz (1920-2002), a French resistance fighter during World War II and a survivor of the women’s concentration camp Ravensbrück; and Ruth Klüger (1931-2020), an Austrian-Jewish student who survived Auschwitz and became a professor in the U.S. The overarching theme of the seminar is the struggle of women for equal economic, social and political rights. We will explore what effects social and political changes, revolutions and wars as well as the Holocaust had on this struggle and the lives of women in Europe more general. Through intensive discussions of the reading in class, group work and the opportunity to do research on an autobiography written by a European women born between the 1850s and 1920s of their own choice, the seminar offers students a unique approach to twentieth century European history, will introduce them to research and writing, and the resources UNC-Chapel Hill offers.

Karen Hagemann

Karen Hagemann is the James G. Kenan Distinguished Professor of History and Adjunct Professor of the Curriculum in Peace, War and Defense. She published widely in Modern German, European and Transatlantic history combing political, social, cultural and military history with women’s and gender history. Her most recent English books are: Revisiting Prussia’s Wars against Napoleon: History, Culture, and Memory (Cambridge University Press, 2015); Gendering Post-1945 German History: Entanglements, ed. with Donna Harsch, and Friederike Brühöfener (Berghahn Books, 2019); and Oxford Handbook on Gender, War and the Western World since 1600, ed. with Stefan Dudink and Sonya O. Rose (Oxford University Press, 2020) (http://history.unc.edu/people/faculty/karenhagemann) and (https://hagemann.web.unc.edu/).

 

HIST 89-001: Global History of Food

FY Seminar | TTH, 2:00 PM – 3:15 PM | Instructor(s): Michelle King

What does it mean to study food history, and how do we approach it from a global perspective? The world of food (and the food of the world) is a huge subject, and the focus in this class will be on historical texts and topics (as opposed to contemporary food issues), and on global examples (with an emphasis on non-Western regions, including Asia, Latin America, Africa, the Middle East). Class topics will center on three major themes: Food as Identity (Nation, Gender, Memory, Diaspora), Food as Value (Taste, Commodity, Feasting, Famine); Food in its Modern Forms (Industrialization, Consumption, Globalization). The course emphasis will be on giving students the opportunity to practice fundamental skills of historical methodology (written primary and secondary source analysis), and using what they have learned for a creative final project presentation, based on an oral history interview.

Michelle King

Michelle King is an Associate Professor of History, specializing in modern Chinese gender and food history. She is the editor of Culinary Nationalism in Asia (Bloomsbury Academic, 2019) and a special issue on Chinese culinary regionalism in Global Food History (Summer 2020). Her latest research project focuses on the career of Taiwan’s beloved cooking celebrity, Fu Pei-mei (1931-2004), for which she was awarded a NEH Public Scholars Fellowship. She had the best bowl of noodles in her life twenty-five years ago at a nameless farmstead in rural Hunan province and has been seeking its equal ever since.

 

HNRS 89-001: Narrative and Medicine: Writing COVID/Writing Us

FY Seminar | M, 2:00 PM – 4:30 PM | Instructor(s): Terrence Holt

A workshop in autobiographical and creative short story, focusing on the complex connections between story-telling, interpretive skill, and the practice of medicine. Students will write and distribute autobiographical and and creative short stories about illness and medical care; the seminar will meet weekly to discuss these stories, attempting to identify and articulate the key issues each story expresses about what it means to be sick, what it might mean to take care of others in their illness. The writing and (especially) interpretive skills acquired in this workshop are directly valuable to anyone contemplating a career in medicine, but are equally valuable to anyone who might at some point encounter (in themselves or in someone they care for) the trauma of illness. In addition to the weekly workshop, participants will have one-on-one conferences with the instructor (himself an MD with an international reputation as a writer). The capstone project will be a public reading (via webinar, allowing participants to invite an audience from anywhere on the globe) of participants’ work, which may (at student option) be in the form of a film composed under guidance of experts at the University’s Media Resources Center illustrating images and themes from the written work.

Terrence Holt

Terrence Holt (M.F.A., Ph.D. Cornell University; M.D. UNC), has held a faculty position at the School of Medicine since completing his residency (internal medicine) in 2003. He teaches topics ranging from health care finance to medical ethics to narrative medicine. For ten years a contributing editor to Men's Health, he publishes and speaks widely on a range of topics related to ethical and experiential questions of medical practice. His short story collections (In the Valley of the Kings, Internal Medicine) have appeared on numerous "best of" lists, including the New York Times bestsellers, and have been reprinted, translated, and anthologized in the US, Europe, and Asia. He thinks of this course as his central contribution to his teaching at Carolina, one that combines the multiple disciplinary strands of his career into a unified experience for learners at a range of levels.

 

ITAL 51-001: Contagion and Culture: Lessons from Italy

FY Seminar | TTH, 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM | Instructor(s): Maggie Fritz-Morkin

Set in plague-stricken Florence of 1348, Boccaccio’s Decameron begins with a portrait of social unravelling and civic collapse that is uncannily familiar in our jarring new pandemic reality. What can medieval literature and philosophy tell us about how to live when our knowledge, institutions, and laws falter? Who is at fault when catastrophe strikes? What is the role of art in responding to trauma, in rebuilding society? How does communal suffering compare to private suffering? How are power and privilege revealed, increased, or challenged in a pandemic? How do the narratives we tell about different maladies shape our lives and communities? This course explores Italian responses over the course of seven centuries to these questions, and reflects on how the Italian story continues to shape North American culture.

Maggie Fritz-Morkin

Maggie Fritz-Morkin studies the literature and culture of medieval Italy. She has published numerous essays on the ethics of visceral language, and is finishing a book on obscenity in the literary works of Dante, Petrarch, and Boccaccio. Her current research interests include the obsession with fraud in late medieval Italy, conflicting theories of debt and obligation, and medieval women's voices in the articulation of justice.

 

MASC 53-001: The Ends of the Earth: Polar Oceanography and Exploration

FY Seminar | TTH, 9:30 AM – 10:45 AM | Instructor(s): Carol Arnosti

What explains the ‘pull of the Poles’? What motivated early explorers to undergo great hardships to investigate the Arctic and Antarctic, and what did they discover about these regions? What have we discovered in the intervening decades, and what do we still not understand about polar regions? Why do the Arctic and Antarctic play such a critical role in global climate? This seminar will combine scientific and historical perspectives to investigate the ‘ends of the earth’, the Arctic and Antarctica. We will begin by surveying the geography and oceanography of these regions, and then step back into the past and follow in the footsteps of some of the early polar explorers through their own accounts of their explorations. Modern accounts will help us compare and contrast these early explorations. The seminar will also include readings and discussions about current questions and problems of the polar regions, in particular human impacts and potential effects of global warming. A ‘Makerspace’ component is an important feature of the class – students will be supplied with materials to work on a design/build challenge, testing, revising, discussing, and consulting with one another to improve their efforts through the course of the semester. This ‘making’ experience is highly relevant to the experiences of early polar explorers as well as modern oceanographers, who often have to improvise and fix or build or create things on the spot, with materials at hand, in order to solve specific problems. Note that no experience in Makerspace, and no design or build experience, is assumed, expected, or required for this seminar. There are no prerequisites for this seminar.

Carol Arnosti

Carol Arnosti grew up in Wisconsin, where she developed an early appreciation for snow and ice. As an undergraduate at Lawrence University, she majored in chemistry, studied history, and played intercollegiate basketball. After completing a Ph.D. in oceanography at M.I.T. and the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, she went to the Max-Planck Institute in Bremen, Germany, where she rapidly became involved in a new project investigating microbial life at low temperatures. Continued involvement in this project since moving to Chapel Hill in 1995 has led to repeated research work in the Arctic as well as a trip to Antarctica, and a permanent case of ‘Polar Fever’.

 

MATH 130-01F: Precalculus Mathematics

FY Launch | TTH, 3:30 PM – 4:45 PM | Instructor(s): Emily Burkhead

Requisites: Prerequisite, MATH 110; a grade of C- or better is required. Covers the basic mathematical skills needed for learning calculus. Topics are calculating and working with functions and data, introduction to trigonometry, parametric equations, and the conic sections. A student may not receive credit for this course after receiving credit for MATH 231.

Emily Burkhead

My field of study is discrete dynamical systems and ergodic theory, wherein we study the behavior of systems that change over time. The underlying question for a particular system is how predictable or chaotic the behavior is and that can be classified in terms of either topological properties or probabilistic ones. Early work of mine developed a topological classification of a particular type of function called cellular automata that operates on a symbolic space: points in this space consist of an assignment of a state from a finite set to each integer lattice point in n-space. Cellular automata are functions that update each state simultaneously at each time step according to a single rule. Recent work has focused on modeling using stochastic cellular automata, related objects that are not deterministic maps but ones that select from a finite list of rules to apply at each location and at each time step. With Donna Molinek, Davidson College, and Jane Hawkins, UNC CH Emerita, I have analyzed a model for HIV within the lymph nodes, developed and analyzed a model for Ebola within an organ. Currently, my professional focus is on mathematics education and best practices in teaching.

 

MATH 231H-01F: Calculus of Functions of One Variable I

FY Launch | MWF, 10:10 AM – 11:00 AM | Instructor(s): Xuqiang Qin | Lab/Recitation: MATH 231H-617

Requisites: Prerequisites, MATH 110 and 130; Requires a grade of C- or better in MATH 130 or placement by the department. Limits, derivatives, and integrals of functions of one variable. Students may not receive credit for both MATH 231 and MATH 241.

Math 231 is designed to provide a detailed introduction to the fundamental ideas of calculus. It does not assume any prior calculus knowledge, but the student is expected to be proficient working with functions and their graphs as well as manipulating variable expressions and solving equations using algebra.

This is the Honors section of Math 231. It offers a more demanding and deeper treatment than the regular sections as well as more involved applications. There will be more emphasis on understanding theory than in other sections, and students will be expected to understand and reproduce proofs of theorems and formulas. In addition, this section will cover extra topics, including the epsilon-delta definition of limit. Applications will be more involved and will sometimes involve real data. Homework will be more challenging, with more emphasis on creative problem solving and less emphasis on drill. Students will be expected to complete a final project.

Xuqiang Qin

 

MUSC 89-001: Music and Women's Rights

FY Seminar | MW, 10:10 AM – 11:25 AM | Instructor(s): Anne MacNeil

This seminar is about the protest songs and history of the First and Second Waves of American feminism, from the Seneca Falls Convention in 1848 – where women declared their equality with men and called for women’s right to vote – to the passage of Roe v. Wade and the Equal Rights Amendment in the 1970s. Issues for discussion include the intersectionality of women’s rights and civil rights movements.

Anne MacNeil

Professor MacNeil grew up in the women's rights movement of the 1960s and 70s, marching in Take Back the Night Rallies and singing the songs of the women's movement. My hometown of Ithaca, NY is about 40 miles from Seneca Falls, where the first Convention on Women's Rights was held July 19 and 20, 1848. My grandmother was a member of the Wyoming County Women's Christian Temperance Union (WCTU), my mother was a Link Trainer operator during World War II, and my godmother authored the first women's reproductive rights legislation for the state of New York - the legislation on which Roe v. Wade is based. I am thrilled to be working with you all this semester and to be exploring the history and music of the American women's movements from the 19th to the 20th centuries. The material content of our course this semester pays homage to women's struggles for voting rights and equality - struggles that have resulted in 2020 in the inauguration of the first female vice-president of the United States.

 

PHIL 55-001: Paradoxes

FY Seminar | TTH, 2:00 PM – 3:15 PM | Instructor(s): Daniel Muñoz

Philosophy is bursting with paradoxes: Zeno’s paradoxes of motion, the Liar Paradox, the Sorites Paradox, and also modern puzzles like the Trolley Problem. This class will explore the most exciting and influential paradoxes in the field, starting with ancient puzzles about infinity and ending with modern moral dilemmas.

Daniel Muñoz

Daniel Muñoz is an assistant professor in Philosophy and core faculty in Philosophy, Politics, and Economis. He completed his PhD at MIT in 2019. He is writing two books in moral philosophy: What We Owe to Ourselves (Oxford University Press) and 50 Paradoxes, Puzzles, and Thought Experiments in Ethical Theory (Routledge, with Sarah Stroud).

 

PHIL 63-001: Mind, Brain, and Consciousness

FY Seminar | TTH, 9:30 AM – 10:45 AM | Instructor(s): Ram Neta

Many features of human consciousness are puzzling. Why are people so ready to believe extraordinary claims on the basis of virtually no evidence whatsoever, but unwilling to accept the reality of well-documented phenomena? Why are people repulsed by some very ordinary biological phenomena but not by others? Why is it that some commonplace events can make some people anxious, while even near-fatal events can leave them unruffled? Why are we so much more willing to eat some things than others? This course will examine psychodynamic theories that attempt to explain these phenomena.

Ram Neta

Ram Neta is Professor of Philosophy at UNC-Chapel Hill, where he has taught since 2003. His research is an effort to understand what it is to be rational, and why rationality matters. In pursuing this broad question, he ends up addressing lots of related questions about the role of knowledge in our decision-making, the ways in which our training informs our experience of the world, and the function of evidence in deliberation. He has published scores of articles on these and related topics in academic journals.

 

PHIL 80-001: Short Stories and Contemporary Social Problems

FY Seminar | MW, 3:35 PM – 4:50 PM | Instructor(s): Luc Bovens

What is the point of learning about ethics? An ethics course should teach you how to recognize a moral issue when it stares you in the face. You should learn to appreciate its intricacies, to reason your way through it, and to discuss it with your peers. This will raise your skills of critical reflection and your moral sensitivities. And if you can translate what you gained into action, dare I say it, then it will make you into a better person as well. Short stories—much more so than the classics or contemporary journals of professional philosophy—are a great tool for this purpose. In this course, we will explore contemporary social, political and moral issues through short stories in world literature connect these stories with research papers in the social sciences and the humanities, blogs, and newspaper articles.

Luc Bovens

Professor Bovens is Professor of Philosophy and Core Faculty in UNC’s Philosophy, Politics and Economics Program. His philosophical interests are broad and include paradoxes of rationality, issues in formal epistemology, philosophy of economics, political science, moral psychology, and bioethics.

 

PHYS 118H-01F: Introductory Calculus-based Mechanics and Relativity

FY Launch | LEC: MWF, 8:00 AM - 8:50 AM, LAB: MW, 10:10 AM – 12:00 PM | Instructor(s): Wei Zhang, Laurie McNeil | Lab/Recitation: PHYS 118H-401 (this studio lab operates as the FY Launch)

Requisites: Prerequisite, MATH 231; Pre- or corequisite, MATH 232; permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisites.

Mechanics of particles and rigid bodies. Newton’s laws; mechanical and potential energy; mechanical conservation laws; frame-dependence of physical laws; Einstein’s Theory of Relativity. Students may not receive credit for PHYS 118 in addition to PHYS 104, 114, or 116.

Wei Zhang

Laurie McNeil

Laurie McNeil spent her childhood in Ann Arbor, Michigan before studying Chemistry and Physics at Radcliffe College (Harvard University) and Physics at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, where she received her Ph.D. in 1982. After spending two years conducting research at MIT, she moved to Chapel Hill, where she has taught elementary physics, optics, solid-state physics, and materials science. Her seminar grows out of her life as a choral singer (and, earlier, a violinist and recorder player). When not singing with the Choral Society of Durham, she can be found in her laboratory using lasers to study the properties of materials.

 

PHYS 119-01F: Introductory Calculus-based Electromagnetism and Quanta

FY Launch | LEC: MWF, 9:05 AM - 9:55 AM, LAB: MW, 10:10 AM – 12:00 PM | Instructor(s): Julieta Gruszko, Jennifer Weinberg-Wolf | Lab/Recitation: PHYS 119-401 (this studio lab operates as the FY Launch)

Requisites: Prerequisite, PHYS 118; Pre- or corequisite, MATH 233; permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisites. Unification of the laws of electricity and magnetism; electromagnetic waves; the particle-wave duality; fundamental principles and applications of quantum mechanics. Students may not receive credit for PHYS 119 in addition to PHYS 105, 115, or 117.

Julieta Gruszko

Julieta is originally from Buenos Aires, Argentina, and grew up in Poughkeepsie, New York. She arrived at UNC Chapel Hill in January 2020 after spending 2 years as a Pappalardo Fellow at MIT, working with Lindley Winslow and Joe Formaggio. She completed her PhD as a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellow in Jason Detwiler’s group at the University of Washington, where she studied neutrinoless double-beta decay with the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR, and received her BS in physics and BA in mathematics from University of Rochester.

Jennifer Weinberg-Wolf

I grew up in the Chicago-land area (Northern suburbia), moved to Cambridge for college and then down to Chapel Hill for graduate school. Loved the area (and had a new baby) after graduating, so we stayed. Now I’ve got two wonderful daughters who are NC natives. I’m currently a teaching assistant professor at UNC and am passionate about teaching and outreach. When I’m not with students, I can be found watching my girls competitive jumprope (Go Aerotrix!), trying out a new recipe or curling up with a book (mysteries are my favorite!)

 

PHYS 54-001: Physics of Movies

FY Seminar | TTH, 12:30 PM – 1:45 PM | Instructor(s): Christian Iliadis

In this seminar, we will analyze physics concepts by watching scenes from popular movies. The overall goal is to disentangle the complicated interplay of physics ideas in real-life situations and thereby to improve significantly our problem-solving skills. Emphasis is placed on group work rather than on traditional teaching. We will be addressing questions such as: Which scenes from movies are unphysical and which are realistic? How are physicists portrayed in movies? How does physics research influence society? Ultimately, we will gain a more fundamental understanding for physical concepts and how these concepts shape our world view. No prerequisite is required.

Christian Iliadis

Christian Iliadis is a Greek who was born and raised in Germany. He obtained his diploma in physics from the University of Muenster/Germany and then moved to Notre Dame where he received his Ph.D. He spent three years in Vancouver, working in Canada’s largest nuclear physics laboratory. Since 1996, he has been Professor of Physics and Astronomy at UNC–CH, teaching a variety of undergraduate and graduate courses. His research specialty is nuclear astrophysics, which is the science of how stars generate energy and produce the elements in the Universe via nuclear fusion reactions. He also wrote a recently published textbook on this subject. His favorite hobby is soccer (or football, as it is called in the rest of the world).

 

PLAN 59-001: World's Fairs

FY Seminar | TTH, 9:30 AM – 10:45 AM | Instructor(s): Alainna Thomas

This course introduces students to World’s Fairs in the US between 1893 and 1965 (1884 World Cotton Centennial, New Orleans; 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition, Chicago; 1904 Louisiana Purchase Exposition, Saint Louis; 1939 New York World’s Fair; 1962 Seattle World’s Fair; 1964/1965 New York World’s Fair). We will look at how ideas about cities and world’s fairs changed over time. We will also look at the role World’s Fairs played in: (1) promoting a city’s place in the US and the world, (2) addressing social issues, and (3) disseminating ideas about progress. We will learn about world’s fairs through documentaries (video/audio), texts, as well as examine memorabilia from each of the Fairs. Students will be responsible for participating in weekly discussions on readings and biweekly journal responses. Students will work on a group project on a world’s fair and present at the end of the semester. This project can use traditional means of presentations–such as PowerPoint and posters, or it could be a podcast (5 minutes), video, or some other media.

Alainna Thomas

Dr. Allie Thomas looks at how technology can be used to address both environmental sustainability and social equity within the transportation sector. She relies upon qualitative methods to investigate the phenomenon of how and why technologies are accepted or rejected She sometimes embeds herself in the planning context to learn where the process succeeds or breaks down. Her work has looked bus rapid transit adaption in China, electric bikes in San Francisco, and the use of ridehailing services across Generation X and millennials in the Southeastern US. She is currently working on understanding how transit agencies adapt cashless fare technologies.

 

PLCY 51-001: The Global Environment in the 21st Century

FY Seminar | TTH, 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM | Instructor(s): Elizabeth Sasser

Explores linkages among nations, global environmental institutions, and the environmental problems they cause and seek to rectify. Introduces pressing challenges of the global environment, particularly around energy use and climate change, and potential solutions. Discusses perspectives of nations, NGOs, and the international community involved in crafting policy solutions. This class does not have any prerequisites.

Elizabeth Sasser

Elizabeth Sasser is a Teaching Assistant Professor in Public Policy with extensive experience in federal and state government. Prior to joining UNC, she served as policy advisor at the U.S. Department of Energy, where she worked with U.S. and Chinese government leadership on strategies to advance U.S. interests on environmental and energy issues. She was also a policy advisor to two North Carolina governors on energy and education issues. She has a B.A. and an M.P.P. from Duke University and has studied at Peking University in Beijing, China, where she developed a fluency in Mandarin.

 

PLCY 61H-001: Policy Entrepreneurship and Public/Private/Non-Profit Partnerships

FY Seminar | MW, 1:25 PM – 2:40 PM | Instructor(s): Daniel Gitterman

This seminar will define a policy entrepreneur and examine strategies used by policy entrepreneurs to achieve policy change or innovation in the policy making process. This course also aims to explore ways that public, private, and non-profit sectors collaborate to address problems that cannot be solved by one sector alone. There is growing recognition that sustainable solutions to some of the most complex challenges confronting our communities can benefit from these collaborative or “intersector” approaches.

Daniel Gitterman

Daniel Gitterman is Duncan MacRae ’09 and Rebecca Kyle MacRae Professor and Chair of Public Policy at UNC-Chapel Hill. He also serves as Director of the Honors Seminar in Public Policy and Global Affairs (Washington, DC).

 

POLI 130-01F: Introduction to Comparative Politics

FY Launch | MW, 3:35 PM – 4:50 PM | Instructor(s): Ashley Anderson

This course examines the diversity of political arrangements in societies across the globe. Honors version available.

Ashley Anderson

Ashley Anderson is an Assistant Professor of Political Science at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. She received her Ph.D. and M.A. in Government from Harvard University, and also holds a B.A. in International Relations from Stanford University. Most recently, she served as a post-doc in the UNC Political Science department with funding from the Carolina Post-Doctoral Program for Faculty Diversity. A specialist in comparative politics, her research interests include contentious politics, authoritarian regimes, and political institutions.

Currently, Ashley is working on a book project on variation in union responses to political movements in authoritarian regimes, with a particular emphasis on how varied strategies of labor incorporation in North African regimes lead to divergent patterns interest articulation, organizational development and anti-regime contention among union federations. In addition to this work, newer research projects examine the dynamics of opposition movements in authoritarian regimes more broadly, with applications to state-mobilized contention and Islamist party success.

 

POLI 63-001: Social Movements and Political Protest and Violence

FY Seminar | TTH, 12:30 PM – 1:45 PM | Instructor(s): Pamela Conover

This seminar focuses on explaining and understanding social movements and the collective political behaviors that they promote (e.g. demonstrations, protests, violence, and eco-terrorism). Our theoretical focus will be interdisciplinary, drawing on research in political behavior, social psychology, sociology, political theory, and the law. We will discuss when and why collective action occurs, who participates, what forms it takes, and how governments respond. Substantively, we will study a variety of movements including: Black Lives Matter, #MeToo movement, the Environmental movement, the White Nationalist movement, COVID protests, and the January 6th Capitol protest. We will use a variety of approaches and resources: class discussions, films, online forum discussions, and texts. Grades will be based on class participation, forum participation, a writing project, and several group papers.

This class will be taught remotely with both asychronous and sychronous components.

Pamela Conover

Pamela Conover, Burton Craige Professor of Political Science, was educated at Emory University and received her Ph.D. at the University of Minnesota. Professor Conover teaches courses dealing with political psychology, women and politics, and social movements and political protest. In the past, Professor Conover’s research has concerned the nature of political thinking and the politics of identity and citizenship. She also coauthored the book Feminism and the New Right. Her current research is focused on election aversion, religious freedom, and the effect of worldviews on political behavior. In her spare time, she enjoys cycling, yoga and being walked by her two golden retrievers, Sophie and Henry.

 

POLI 70-001: Political Conflict in the European Union and the United States

FY Seminar | TTH, 2:00 PM – 3:15 PM | Instructor(s): Gary Marks

This course is concerned with politics and political conflict in the European Union and the United States. In part one you will learn about how democracy works (or doesn’t work) in liberal democracies. Why did socialism fail in the United States? What difference does the electoral system make? What are the reasons for the rise of nationalism and populism in Europe and the United States? How have these societies struggled with the challenge of the Coronavirus?

Gary Marks

Gary Marks is Burton Craige Professor of Political Science and Robert Schuman Fellow at the European University Institute, Florence. He served as the director and co-founder the UNC Center for European Studies and EU Center of Excellence. In 2017 he received the Daniel Elazar Distinguished Federalism Scholar Award from the American Political Science Association and has received the Humboldt Prize for his contributions to political science. Professor Marks has written more than a dozen books and is one of the most cited scholars worldwide in political science.

 

POLI 75-001: Thinking about Law

FY Seminar | MW, 3:35 PM – 4:50 PM | Instructor(s): Charles Szypszak

Are you interested in being a lawyer or public official? Do you know what it means to “think like a lawyer?” Have you considered why people mostly honor the law? Where do you find “the law?” How do judges decide difficult cases? This seminar will explore the notion of a rule of law, formal and customary law, legal analysis, judicial interpretation and the realities of the adversarial system and law practice. We will consider what makes law seem legitimate and how to assess whether it promotes liberty and justice. This seminar will challenge students to be reflective and critical about their own perspectives and to explore personal responsibility for promoting a rule of law. Students will be engaged in analytical thinking and expression through required participation in teacher-led dialogues based on assigned readings and with research and writing assignments. Reading materials include selections from court cases and other sources that provide an introduction to the notion of a rule of law, the sources of law that govern us and protect our individual rights, the nature of legal analysis, the different methods of judicial interpretation, and the realities of law practice and the adversarial system.

Charles Szypszak

Charles Szypszak is Albert Coates Distinguished Professor of Public Law and Government. He has been with the School of Government since 2005. Prior to that, he was an attorney and director of a general practice firm in New Hampshire. He provides legal counsel to state, national and international institutions, organizations and public officials and teaches Law for Public Administration in the graduate program in public administration. He has taught and worked on law reforms in Poland and Russia. He is the recipient of the University’s J. Carlyle Sitterson Freshman Teaching Award and the School of Government’s Coates Distinguished Professorship for Teaching Excellence.

 

POLI 76-001: The Obama Presidency

FY Seminar | TTH, 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM | Instructor(s): Christopher Clark

This course examines the presidency of Barack Obama, the first African American to serve in the nation’s highest office. The course is broken down into four parts. The first part studies Shirley Chisholm and Jesse Jackson, two black people who ran for President prior to Obama. The second part examines Obama prior to running for office, reading a book that he authored. The third part of the class examines Obama’s presidency, both how he reached office and a look back at what he achieved while in office. The last part of the class considers American politics post-Obama, with a particular focus on race/ethnicity.

Christopher Clark

Christopher J. Clark’s research focuses on black electoral representation and its influence on political processes. Clark earned his Ph.D. in Political Science in 2010 from the University of Iowa, and he has been on faculty at UNC since July 2012. Chris is a huge sports fan, with his favorite team being the Kansas City Chiefs. He is married to Tiana and is father of Kaya, Cadence, and Kinlee; they all bring him great joy. Chris enjoys reading, cooking, playing sports, and he is active in his church community.

 

POLI 87-001: What Does it Mean to be a Good Citizen?

FY Seminar | MWF, 1:25 PM – 2:15 PM | Instructor(s): Nora Hanagan

What, if any, responsibilities accompany democratic citizenship? Voting? Active participation in political meetings? Obeying laws? Volunteering in one’s community? Preserving natural resources for future generations? Adhering to certain values? Protesting unjust laws? This course offers an overview of the different ways in which Americans have answered these questions.

Nora Hanagan

Professor Nora Hanagan studies political ideas. She is particularly interested in the ideas that have animated American politics and history. She also researches different approaches to environmental and food politics. Her book, Democratic Responsibility: The Politics of Many Hands in America, examines whether individuals bear responsibility for harms that are caused by social institutions and processes. She is also affiliated with the Program for Public Discourse and the Philosophy, Politics, and Economic Program. When she isn’t chasing her young children around, she likes gardening and hiking. She is also still trying to make a sourdough starter.

 

POLI 89-001: Introduction to Constitutional Conflicts

FY Seminar | TTH, 12:30 PM – 1:45 PM | Instructor(s): Michael Gerhardt

This seminar will introduce students to the issues, arguments, history, impact, and reasoning arising from or in conflicts between presidents and Congress. The constitutional conflicts that are the focus of the course involve presidents and Congress fighting for primacy in areas in which they have shared constitutional powers.

Michael Gerhardt

Michael Gerhardt is the Burton Craig Distinguished Professor of Jurisprudence at the University of North Carolina Law School. He is the author of seven books, including The Forgotten Presidents: Their Untold Constitutional Legacy, which the Financial Times named as one of the best non-fiction books of 2013, and over 100 articles on constitutional law. He has testified more than 20 times before the House or Senate, has been special counsel to the Senate Judiciary Committee for the confirmation proceedings for seven of the nine sitting justices of the Supreme Court, and served as special counsel to the Presiding Officer in Donald Trump's second impeachment trial in the Senate.

 

PSYC 101-01F: General Psychology

FY Launch | TTH, 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM | Instructor(s): Charlie Wiss

PSYC 101 is a prerequisite for all psychology courses. A survey of major principles of psychology and an introduction to scientific modes of thought about behavior. Students participate in ongoing psychological research in the department.

Charlie Wiss

 

PSYC 58H-001: The Psychology of Mental States and Language Use

FY Seminar | TTH, 2:00 PM – 3:15 PM | Instructor(s): Jennifer Arnold

As adults we constantly make judgments about other people’s beliefs, desires, goals, knowledge, and intentions from evidence like eye gaze and inferences from their words and actions. These judgments together can be called mindreading, or theory of mind (where “theory” refers to the theory someone might hold about another’s mental state, not a scientific theory). This information is known to guide some aspects of language use — for example, you wouldn’t ask someone to hand you “that book” if they don’t know it exists. But sometimes you might ignore what someone else does or does not know – for instance asking someone for “the red book” when that person is sitting in front of two red books. This course examines how children, adults, and individuals with autism infer other people’s mental states, and how they use it to guide decisions during speaking and understanding. A major focus of this course is on research methods, and how to investigate questions of mental state and language processing empirically. The course culminates in students conducting an original research project and reporting it in both spoken and written formats.

Jennifer Arnold

Dr. Jennifer Arnold is a Professor in the Department of Psychology and Neuroscience. She studies the ways that our minds handle the jobs of speaking and understanding. How do speakers choose words and produce them? How do listeners pick out the speaker’s meaning? Her research is guided by questions about how people represent the thoughts, intentions, and mental activities of other people, and how this information influences specific linguistic processes.

 

RELI 70-001: Jesus in Scholarship and Film

FY Seminar | TTH, 9:30 AM – 10:45 AM | Instructor(s): Bart Ehrman

This seminar will examine how historians have reconstructed the life, teachings and death of the historical Jesus. We will look at the Gospels of the New Testament, as well as references to Jesus in other writings (Roman and Jewish sources, as well as Gospels that did not make it into the New Testament). In addition, we will explore how Jesus has been portrayed in modern film, including such Biblical “epics” as The Greatest Story Ever Told, such “period pieces” as Jesus Christ Superstar, such brilliant retellings as Jesus of Montreal and such controversial films as The Last Temptation of Christ and The Passion of the Christ. The ultimate goals of the seminar are to see what we can say about the historical man Jesus himself and how Jesus came to be portrayed in both ancient sources and modern imagination.

Bart Ehrman

Bart Ehrman is the James A. Gray Distinguished Professor of Religious Studies. He has taught at Carolina since 1988. He is author or editor of thirty books and is widely regarded as a leading expert on the New Testament and the history of the early Christian church. He is also a well-known teacher on campus, having won the Undergraduate Students Teaching Award, the Bowman and Gordon Gray Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching and the John William Pope Center Spirit of Inquiry Teaching Award.

 

RELI 71-001: Ethics and the Spirit of the New Capitalism

FY Seminar | TTH, 9:30 AM – 10:45 AM | Instructor(s): Eden Consenstein

In 1905 the sociologist Max Weber famously proclaimed that capitalism has a “spirit.” Beyond just determining how we make money and circulate goods, Weber argued, capitalism is deeply entangled with religious ways of life. Both religious and economic systems work together to determine what we aspire to, how we organize communities and how we define our self-worth. Beginning from this insight, this freshman seminar examines the intersection of capitalism and religion through a series of key terms, including “vocation,” “aspiration,” “commodity,” “celebrity,” and more.

Eden Consenstein

Eden Consenstein is a scholar of religion, media, and capitalism in the United States. She holds a B.A. in Religious Studies and English from the University of Toronto, an M.A in Religious Studies from New York University, and a Ph.D.in the Religious Studies from Princeton University, where she also completed a certificate from the program in Media and Modernity.

She is currently working on two book projects. The first, Religion at Time Inc.: From the Beginning of Time to the End of Life, is a religious history of the major media corporation best known for Time, Life and Fortune magazines. From 1923 to 1964, Time Inc. (sometimes called the Time-Life Corporation) was run by Henry R. Luce, a self-styled theologian and leading Presbyterian layman who insisted that the press should promote high moral standards rather than aim for objectivity. Through extensive research in Time Inc.’s recently publicized corporate archives and close readings of the magazines Luce edited, Religion at Time Inc. describes how the editor’s political-theological convictions shaped Time Inc.’s media. Her second project, Pyramids of Plenty: Christianity and Multi-level Marketing, will be the first work to trace the historical entanglement of U.S. Christianity, new media, and the multi-level marketing industry.

Eden’s teaching and research interests include religion and media, consumerism and material culture, new religious movements, secularism studies, reality television, and histories of capitalism. Her work has been supported by the American Council of Learned Societies, the Eisenhower Foundation, The New-York Historical Society and Princeton University’s Center for the Study of Religion.

 

RELI 80-001: Religion and Writing in the Ancient World

FY Seminar | TTH, 9:30 AM – 10:45 AM | Instructor(s): Joseph Lam

Few technological innovations have more profoundly shaped the course of human civilization than the invention of writing. This course explores the role of writing in the development of ancient religious traditions, covering the wide chronological period from the beginnings of writing in Mesopotamia and Egypt (approximately 3200 BCE) to the advent of Islam. We will begin by considering the nature of writing both as a technology and as a symbolic system, giving attention to insights coming out of modern linguistic research. Then we will examine a series of case studies of the relationship between religion and writing drawn from the ancient world (especially the ancient Near East), in order to illustrate the diversity and complexity of these interactions between technology and society. Specific topics to be addressed include: religion and the early alphabet, magical and mystical uses of writing, religion and literacy, scribal culture, and the development of “scriptural” texts such as the Bible and the Qur’an.

Joseph Lam

Joseph Lam is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Religious Studies. He received his Ph.D. (with Honors) from the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations at the University of Chicago. His research focuses on ancient Near Eastern religious texts and practices, with an emphasis on the diverse written traditions of the Levant (Syria-Palestine) in 2nd and 1st millennia BCE, including the Hebrew Bible. At Carolina, he has taught courses on Classical Hebrew language, Hebrew Bible, ancient Near Eastern culture, and the place of metaphor in religious language.

 

ROML 63-001: Forging Alliances: Religion, War and Cultural Transference on the Camino de Santiago

FY Seminar | MWF, 11:15 AM – 12:05 PM | Instructor(s): Hélène de Fays

This course explores the role the Camino de Santiago (the Way of St. James) played in the construction of a distinctive Spanish identity in the medieval period of Europe. We will approach this issue from a variety of perspectives. From the religious point of view, we will discuss the transformation of the man into a legend and eventually a myth, as well as the growth of the pilgrimage to Santiago. From the political and economic perspectives, we will examine the role of the Camino in the strengthening of the first Christian Kingdoms in the North of Spain, the creation of the first Spanish knight orders and their fight against Islam. We will also discuss the cultural transference that took place along the Camino by analyzing the art, architecture, music and literature that developed in the cities and villages along the pilgrimage routes.

Hélène de Fays

Hélène de Fays is a Senior Lecturer in the Romance Studies Department. She has earned undergraduate degrees in Finances and International Relations, as well as an MA and Ph.D. in Hispanic Literature. Her educational and professional backgrounds, as well as her personal multidisciplinary interests, have guided her research and teaching. Dr. de Fays has taught a number of successful cultures courses and has published articles on the concepts of utopia and dystopia in Spanish American Science Fiction and ecofeminism in Central American narrative. She has also co-authored a web-based textbook on the cultural history of the Hispanic world.

 

ROML 89-001: Déjà vu: Medicine and Narration across Time and Space

FY Seminar | MWF, 11:15 AM – 12:05 PM | Instructor(s): Dorothea Heitsch

Hallucinations, depression, hysteria, paranoia, anxiety, neurosis, body dysmorphic disorder, obsession, and pain are only some of the symptoms that will be reflected in the narratives of this course. The authors featured in this seminar are familiar with the medical knowledge of their time and are often patients themselves suffering from the medical conditions they describe. Throughout the semester, we will examine the practices of authors – such as Maupassant, Montaigne, Selzer, Sembène, or Meruane – who not only borrow heavily from medicine in composing their works but also conceive of writing itself as something medical, that is, as having a therapeutic function for both writer and reader. Accordingly, we will study a group of writers and artists across time and space who explore, adapt, and converse with contemporaneous medical learning in their creative works.

Dorothea Heitsch

Dorothea Heitsch is Teaching Professor in French & Francophone Studies in the Department of Romance Studies. In addition to the language sequence, she teaches French grammar & composition, culture courses about France and French-speaking regions, and topics courses across the centuries, inviting students to explore Honors Theses, the Ackland Museum’s visuals, and UNC’s numerous special collections. Her research and teaching include medical, political, and religious issues, and she particularly enjoys pointing students to questions of rhetoric, translation, and linguistic practice. She is the author of two monographs and numerous articles on early modern topics and the co-editor of two collections.

 

INLS 73-001: Smart Cities

FY Seminar | TTH, 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM | Instructor(s): Arcot Rajasekar

A smart city is one where the needs of a populace meet the needs of environmental sustainability. The balance between the social and environmental issues is governed by Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) that power a smart city infrastructure. In this course, we learn about the influence of urban networks, smart city urban planning, energy as a catalyst of sustainable development, smart city infrastructure, sustainable transportation, flow of information and communications, smart grids, digital infrastructure and the role of data and information technology. We will discuss criteria for measuring the smartness of a city, including quality of life, citizen governance, and discuss issues that go towards the making of a future smart city. Several case studies will be presented with guest lecturers invited to present on critical thinking and practices in smart city development. Students will be involved in group projects to assess smartness of cities.

Arcot Rajasekar

Arcot Rajasekar is a Professor in the School of Library and Information Sciences, a Chief Scientist at the Renaissance Computing Institute (RENCI) and co-Director of Data Intensive Cyber Environments (DICE) Center at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. A leading proponent of policy-oriented large-scale data management, Rajasekar has several research projects funded by the NSF, NARA, NIH and other funding agencies. Rajasekar has a PhD in Computer Science from the University of Maryland at College Park and has more than 100 publications in the areas of data grids, digital library, persistent archives, logic programming and artificial intelligence. His latest projects include the Datanet Federation Consortium and the Data Bridge that is building a social network platform for scientific data.

 

SOCI 100-01F: Sociological Perspective Through Documentary Film

FY Launch | TTH, 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM | Instructor(s): Neal Caren

Introduction to sociology as a discipline through documentary film that includes study of differences and equality, social structure and institutions, culture, social change, individuals and populations, and social psychology.

Neal Caren

I am an Associate Professor in the Sociology at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. My current research is on contemporary US social movements and the uses of media data for understanding movement processes. With Edwin Amenta, I am the author of Rough Draft of History: A Century of US Social Movements in the News (Princeton 2022). My work has also appeared in journals such as American Sociological Review, Social Forces, Social Problems, and the Annual Review of Sociology.

I currently serve as the editor of the interdisciplinary social movements journal Mobilization, the premier journal of research specializing in social movements, protests, insurgencies, revolutions, and other forms of contentious politics.

 

SOCI 53-001: The Consequences of Welfare Reform and Prospects for the Future

FY Seminar | TTH, 12:30 PM – 1:45 PM | Instructor(s): Jessica Su

President Bill Clinton ended “welfare as we know it” in 1996 when he signed the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act into law. This significant and historical welfare reform fundamentally changed the federal safety net in the United States and abolished guaranteed aid for those in poverty. In this first-year seminar, we will use a sociological lens to investigate the causes and consequences of welfare reform, as well as the subsequent expansion of other antipoverty programs designed to help the working poor. We will consider a range of viewpoints that inform current policy debates. Topics will include the conceptualization and measurement of poverty, causes of poverty, public and political attitudes toward welfare and the role of the government, and the implementation and efficacy of antipoverty policies.

Jessica Su

Dr. Jessica Houston Su is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology and a Faculty Fellow in the Carolina Population Center. Her research focuses on social inequality in American family life. At first glance, family formation may seem very individualized; decisions about whom we marry, when we have children, and how we raise them are personal. Her work investigates how social inequality contributes to patterns of family formation at the population level, and subsequently affects the development and well-being of parents and children. Her research appears in leading peer-reviewed journals such as Demography, the Journal of Marriage and Family, and the Journal of Health and Social Behavior. She received her Ph.D. in Sociology from Cornell University and her B.A. in Sociology from Dartmouth College.

 

SOCI 57H-001: Rationalization and the Changing Nature of Social Life in 21st-Century America

FY Seminar | TTH, 3:30 PM – 4:45 PM | Instructor(s): Howard Aldrich

Today, fast food restaurants have become a model for everyday life. Some scholars have even talked about the “McDonaldization” of the nation and the world. By that, scholars mean a drive toward greater efficiency, predictability, calculability, and control by non-human technologies in modern organizations. This drive has shaped many features of American life, including health care, law, and education. Such forces have even affected personal relationships. Sociologists have a term for this process: “rationalization.” We will explore “rationalization” through a process called “active learning” in which you will have opportunities to explore online resources, engage in peer-to-peer discussions, and work with me to develop a research project in which you explore the impact of rationalization on an occupation that might be a destination for you. We will spend one class period, every other week, working on the term paper in class. We will have four or five guests, sharing their expertise on how rationalization has affected their work. You will be assessed based on your contributions to blog posts, class discussion, short answer written assignments, and a research project culminating in a term paper (15-20 pages). You will then build an Adobe Spark page that explains, to the world, what you have learned. We will have no traditional examinations or quizzes.

Visit https://howardaldrich.org to view samples of prior term papers. Click on “Rationalization” in the top ribbon to see the beautifully illustrated term projects.

Howard Aldrich

Howard E. Aldrich is Kenan Professor of Sociology. He has won numerous awards for his teaching and mentoring: Favorite Professor Award from the senior class at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; graduate students’ Award for Best Teaching, Department of Sociology, several times; and the J Carlyle Sitterson Freshman Teaching Award from the University of Carolina Chapel Hill. His two sons and his daughters-in-law graduated from Carolina. Alas, his grandchildren have gone elsewhere. His main research interests are entrepreneurship, entrepreneurial team formation, gender and entrepreneurship, and evolutionary theory. He enjoys foreign travel and he fly fishes year-round in the mountains of Western North Carolina and Eastern Tennessee and wherever else his travels may take him. Photos of his catches may be viewed on his homepage, as well as samples of students’ work in prior semesters. Look for “Rationalization.”

 

SOCI 89-001: Discrimination in the Labor Market

FY Seminar | TTH, 2:00 PM – 3:15 PM | Instructor(s): Kate Weisshaar

There are many forms of inequality in the U.S. labor market and in workplaces, including, for example, inequality across gender, race/ethnicity, social class, immigration status, sexual orientation, and parental status; and across dimensions and outcomes including pay, hiring opportunities, job authority, performance evaluations, and promotion decisions. This first-year seminar provides a deep dive into labor market inequality and specifically focuses on the causes, consequences, and opportunities to change inequalities arising from discrimination. We will consider questions such as: What are the causes of inequality and discrimination? How have causes and patterns of inequality changed in recent history? How do legal, academic, and other institutions understand discrimination, and how do these understandings differ from the lived experiences of people who may face discrimination? What forms of information would offer convincing evidence of discrimination? What are the consequences of labor market inequalities and how do experiences of discrimination shape future opportunities? Finally, we will consider what organizations and individuals can do differently to evaluate labor market or workplace inequality, develop solutions to reduce these forms of inequality, and implement sustainable changes.

Kate Weisshaar

Dr. Kate Weisshaar is an Associate Professor in the Sociology Department at UNC-Chapel Hill and a Faculty Fellow at the Carolina Population Center. She received her PhD in 2016 from Stanford University. Her research focuses on inequality in the labor market, and she studies topics relating to gender, race, work and family, and ways that organizations and individuals can change levels of inequality.

 

WGST 68-001: Assumed Identities: Performance in Photography

FY Seminar | TTH, 9:30 AM – 10:45 AM | Instructor(s): Susan Harbage Page

Our day to day lives are filled with selfies and social media images. This course asks students to re-examine these images through feminist analysis. Students will make self-portraits that reflect the multiple and changing aspects of their identity and contemporary society. Thru role-playing, performance, and documentation we work to understand the construction of identity and the ways in which photography can help us control our own narratives.

We begin the semester with a close look at the ethics and issues of representation throughout the history of photography. Using visual analysis, we explore how photographers have historically used assumed identities and theatrical aspects of photography to push the boundaries of their realities and challenge society’s stereotypes. Students will complete the semester with a stronger set of visual literacy skills and a better understanding of how our identities are shaped by society and how we shape our identities and society in return.

There are no specific camera requirements. Phone cameras are the perfect tool for this course.

Susan Harbage Page

Susan Harbage Page is an Associate Professor in the Department of Women’s and Gender Studies. Harbage Page is a visual artist with a background in photography and lens-based work that explores immigration, race, and gender. She is well-known for her work on the U.S. – Mexico Border which explores bodies and belonging through photography, the creation of an "Anti-Archive" of objects left-behind on the border and site-specific art interventions which involve performative actions in the space of a border.

 

AAAD 51-001: Masquerades of Blackness

FY Seminar | TTH, 9:30 AM – 10:45 AM | Instructor(s): Charlene Regester

This seminar is designed to investigate how the concept of race has been represented in cinema historically, with a particular focus on representations of race when blackness is masqueraded. Its intent is to launch an investigative inquiry into how African Americans are represented on screen in various time periods, how we as spectators are manipulated by these cinematic constructions of race, and how race is marked or coded other than through visual representation. Students will view films that deal with “passing” from the various historical periods and will utilize theoretical concepts introduced in class to read these visual representations. Films selected for viewing include the pre-World War II Era, the Civil Rights Era, and the “Post-Racial” era. Students will be required to write three papers that reflect their ability to apply theoretical concepts to reading racialized representations on screen in these three historical periods to demonstrate their understanding of how racial masquerades have evolved over time and continue to persist in contemporary culture.

Charlene Regester

Charlene Regester is an Associate Professor in the Department of African, African American, and Diaspora Studies and Affiliate Faculty for the Global Cinema Minor. She received her BA, MA, Ph.D. from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. She is the author of African American Actresses: The Struggle for Visibility, 1900-1960 (which was nominated by the press to the NAACP Image Awards). She is the 2011 recipient of the Trailblazer Award Hayti Heritage Film Festival and 2007 Oscar Micheaux Book and Film Award from the Oscar Micheaux Film Festival, South Dakota. She has appeared on North Carolina Bookwatch with UNC-TV 2011; WUNC-FM Radio “The State of Things;” and Turner Movie Classics. Documentaries in which she has appeared include: Movies of Color: Black Southern Cinema (2003, Tom Thurman director), Beyond Tara: The Extraordinary Life of Hattie McDaniel (2001), Madison Davis Lacy director), and Birth of a Movement (2017, Bestor Cram and Susan Gray directors).

 

AAAD 54-001: African Migrations, Boundaries, Displacements, and Belonging

FY Seminar | MW, 1:25 PM – 2:40 PM | Instructor(s): Michael Lambert

Boundary making, migration, and population displacement have been significant dimensions of the contemporary African experience. How has boundary making, broadly defined (inclusive of national borders, rural-urban distinctions, and ethnic and racial groupings, for example), shaped contemporary Africa? What types of and through what processes were boundaries were created? How did the African people respond to these processes? What population displacements unfolded in the context of this boundary making? And how did the people of Africa make sense of and understand boundary making, migration, and displacement? These are some of the questions we will be examining in this interactive and discussion oriented class. We will build our examination of these issues around six novels written by African authors. These novels will provide insight into the ways by which boundaries, migration, and displacement impacted the everyday lives of the African people.

Michael Lambert

Michael Lambert is an Associate Professor of African Studies and Anthropology. His research has principally been in francophone West Africa with a focus on issues related to migration. He has lived for over five years in Senegal and the neighboring nation of Mauritania, where he served as a Peace Corps volunteer, and he has travelled extensively throughout the continent. His first book, Longing for Exile: Migration and the Making of a Translocal Community in Senegal (West Africa) (Heinemann, 2002), explores the cultural and social history of urban migration in a Senegalese community. His most recent book (co-authored), Up from These Hills: Memories of Cherokee Boyhood (Nebraska [Bison Books], 2011), explores American Indian experience in the mid-20th century.

 

ANTH 53H-037: Darwin's Dangerous Idea

FY Seminar | TTH, 9:30 AM – 10:45 AM | Instructor(s): Paul Leslie

Darwin’s theory of evolution by natural selection is central to one of the most profound revolutions in the history of thought, generating stunning insights but also some misunderstanding and tragic abuse. This seminar aims to provide a clear understanding of how natural selection works, and how it doesn’t. We will examine objections to the theory; how the environmental and health problems we face today reflect processes of natural selection; and recent attempts to understand why we get sick, how we respond to disease, why we get old, why we choose mates the way we do, and more. Class sessions will feature a mix of lecture and discussion of concepts and issues. Students will also engage in small group projects—cooperative explorations of problems raised in class or in the readings and/or designing mini research projects.

Paul Leslie

Paul Leslie’s professional interests focus on human ecology, and he has pursued this primarily through research among nomadic peoples in East Africa. His most recent project entails studying (while nursing an aged Land Rover across the African savanna) human-environment interactions in northern Tanzania, especially how the changing land use and livelihood patterns of the Maasai people living there affect and are affected by wildlife and conservation efforts. When not teaching or practicing anthropology, he enjoys bicycling, motorcycling, woodworking, and jazz.

 

ANTH 62-001: Indian Country Today

FY Seminar | MWF, 11:15 AM – 12:05 PM | Instructor(s): Valerie Lambert

With the United States as our geographic focus, this seminar explores a range of 20th- and early-21st-century American Indian topics and current issues. We look at Indian casinos, tribal colleges, identity, gender, tribal courts, sports, and other topics. An exploration of the history of American Indians before and after the arrival of Europeans, a history with which we begin the seminar, provides essential background for looking at the present and recent past. This seminar will help students better understand the challenges facing American Indian communities both internally and externally and the creative solutions being forged to address these challenges. It will also help students further develop skills in reading, writing, critical analysis, and public speaking.

Valerie Lambert

Valerie Lambert is an associate professor and an enrolled citizen of the Choctaw Nation. She received her Ph.D. in Social Anthropology from Harvard University and has won awards for undergraduate teaching and for a book she wrote about her tribe. She has twice been elected president of the Association of Indigenous Anthropologists. Professor Lambert is married and the mother of two daughters, both of whom are college students.

 

ANTH 64-001: Public Archaeology in Bronzeville, Chicago's Black Metropolis

FY Seminar | MWF, 10:10 AM – 11:00 AM | Instructor(s): Anna Agbe-Davies

The term “African diaspora” usually refers to the consequences of the transatlantic slave trade, but there have been many diasporas of people of African descent. One major movement took place in the U.S. in the early 20th century when millions of people left small southern communities for large industrial northern cities. This seminar examines that phenomenon through the lens of a single site where migrants lived in the city of Chicago. The Phyllis Wheatley Home for Girls was run by black women to provide social services for female migrants from 1926 through the 1960s. Research at this site combines elements of archaeology, anthropology and history to study their lives. Students, working in teams, will have the opportunity to contribute to the ongoing research effort via analysis of written records and artifacts. This multidisciplinary project will be of interest to students curious about 20th century history, African-American culture, museums and heritage, women’s and gender studies, migration and labor history.

Anna Agbe-Davies

Anna Agbe-Davies is an historical archaeologist whose excavations have explored the plantation societies of the colonial southeastern US and Caribbean, as well as towns and cities of the 19th and 20th century Midwest, with an emphasis on sites of the African diaspora. Her projects have included excavation and community collaboration at the sites of New Philadelphia, Illinois and the Phyllis Wheatley Home for Girls on the south side of Chicago. Her research and teaching interests are strongly shaped by her own experiences as an undergraduate at the College of William and Mary and the time she spent working in museum settings before becoming a professor. She received her Ph.D. from the University of Pennsylvania. Prior to that, she was a staff archaeologist for the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation’s Department of Archaeological Research.

 

ANTH 89-001: Don’t Dis My Disability

FY Seminar | TTH, 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM | Instructor(s): Aalyia Sadruddin

In this course, we examine disability from the perspective of cultural and medical anthropology. Specifically, we consider how people living with physical, mental, visible, and invisible disabilities navigate physical and social spaces, deal with prejudices of all kinds, and experience everyday life. By engaging with leading anthropologists and activists, spending time with community-based disability groups on and off campus, and studying cross-cultural scholarship, we will learn about the richness and vitality of disability worlds. Furthermore, we will look at how societal and medical conceptions of disability are changing in the context of COVID-19, human-animal entanglements, and climate change. Overall, the people we meet and material we cover emphasize the multitude of ways in which a focus on disability can generate creative modes of thinking, connection, and experience in the twenty-first century.

Aalyia Sadruddin

Aalyia Sadruddin is a cultural and medical anthropologist who teaches and writes on topics related to aging, biomedical technologies, care, and political culture in postconflict societies. She is currently working on her first book, "After-After-Lives," which documents how women and men in Rwanda who witnessed multiple episodes of political and ethnic conflict between the late 1950s and early 1990s piece together their lives through everyday practices of care, death preparations, and storytelling. Aalyia was born and raised in Kenya and attended college in South Africa. She graduated with her Ph.D. in Anthropology from Yale University. Prior to joining the Department of Anthropology at UNC-Chapel Hill, she was a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Watson Institute of International & Public Affairs at Brown University. Outside of her academic life, Aalyia enjoys reading novels and watching tennis.

 

ANTH 89-002: Archaeology and Popular Culture

FY Seminar | MWF, 10:10 AM – 11:00 AM | Instructor(s): Douglas Smit

Archaeology often captures the popular imagination through fantastic and farfetched portrayals of lost civilizations, aliens, and spectacular treasures. While these depictions of archaeology and the past may not be accurate, the story being told is nonetheless significant and reflects something about the culture that produced it.

This course explores how these films, televisions shows, books, and video games tell stories about the past, what stories are being told, and what these representations imply about the relationship between archaeology and society. We will critically analyze popular representations of archaeology, comparing how competing visions of fact and fiction operate in the public sphere.

Douglas Smit

Douglas Smit is a Teaching Assistant Professor in the Department of Anthropology. He is an archaeologist who currently directs projects in Peru and Philadelphia. His research focuses on the archaeology of the recent past, how local people have interacted with big processes like globalization over the past five hundred years. He is also a newcomer to UNC, having just moved with his partner, an infant, two dogs, and one cat to North Carolina from Philadelphia in the summer of 2022. Beyond archaeology, he loves hiking, basketball/soccer, and reading, non-fiction, although these days, it is mostly child-care.

 

APPL 110-02F: Introduction to Design and Making: Developing Your Personal Design Potential

FY Launch | TTH, 2:00 PM – 3:15 PM | Instructor(s): Richard Goldberg

Students work in flexible, interdisciplinary teams to assess opportunities, brainstorm, and prototype solutions. Design thinking and physical prototyping skills are developed through fast-paced, iterative exercises in a variety of contexts and environments.

Richard Goldberg

Dr. Richard Goldberg is a Teaching Associate Professor and Director of Undergraduate Studies in the Department of Applied Physical Sciences. He received his Ph.D. in Biomedical Engineering at Duke University. Dr. Goldberg is leading the effort to develop new programs in Applied Sciences and Engineering, including a minor that started in 2020 and plans for an upcoming major. He is interested in developing programs that bridge ties between engineering and the liberal arts by promoting an entrepreneurial mindset in our students. His research interests are in engineering education, and in developing technology for people with disabilities.

 

ARTH 61-001: African American Art of the Carolinas

FY Seminar | MWF, 10:10 AM – 11:00 AM | Instructor(s): John Bowles

Focusing on the Carolinas, this seminar explores the many ways African Americans have used art to define themselves and their communities. We will ask how art has been used to maintain cultural traditions, shape American culture and build political solidarity from the era of colonialism and slavery to the present. We will study the cultivation of artistic practices from Africa; African American painters, sculptors and craftsmen who earned national reputations for the quality of their work; artists who re-imagined and redefined African American identity through art; and artists throughout the 20th century who represented the daily lives and hardships of rural and working-class blacks. Students will visit campus museums and archives and conduct original research using regional sources. Persistent questions throughout the semester will include, How does the art of African Americans in the Carolinas provoke us to question our own identities and roles within the region, and what is the contemporary role of art in shaping public discourse?

John Bowles

John Bowles received his Ph.D. from UCLA in 2002 and is a graduate of the Whitney Museum of American Art’s Independent Study Program. He is an historian of African American art, who works from the assumption that art plays an important role in determining how we see ourselves as morally responsible individuals. In his research and teaching, he attempts to convey the urgency of art by addressing moral and political dilemmas we would often rather ignore. He has published articles and art criticism in various journals and has recently completed a book that examines the work of artist Adrian Piper. He is currently writing a book that explores how African American artists have engaged simultaneously with modernism, globalization and diaspora from the Harlem Renaissance of the 1920s until today.

 

ARTS 59-001: Time, A Doorway to Visual Expression

FY Seminar | MW, 2:30 PM – 4:25 PM | Instructor(s): Jim Hirschfield

Alice Walker wrote “Time moves slowly, but passes quickly”. Tennessee Williams wrote, “Time is the longest distance between two places”. Throughout history, time has captivated and inspired artists, writers and musicians. From subtle movements to clearly defined sequences of change, artists will manipulate the element of time to enhance their ideas. “Time, A Doorway to Visual Expression”, considers the concept of time from a variety of perspectives and provides a path to investigate your own notions of time. As a group, we examine this mystifying topic through readings and discussions of Alan Lightman’s Einstein’s Dreams and Leonard Shlain’s Art and Physics. We also watch films, analyze videos and listen to music as we express our personal views through the art making process. As a first-year seminar, the course presumes no previous art experience and students may carry out their projects through a medium of their chossing (e.g., drawing, photography, painting, video, sound, performance and/or sculpture). We will immerse ourselves in the subject of time and create works of art inspired by our personal experiences and increased understanding of Time.

Jim Hirschfield

Jim Hirschfield is a Distinguished Professor in the Department of Art and Art History who began contemplating the experience of time during his travels through the deserts of the southwest in his VW Microbus. He still treasures the experience of travel, which up until the recent pandemic, he did for inspiration, for research, and for adventure. Jim has received a number of art commissions from cities across the country, from Anchorage, Alaska to Fort Lauderdale, Florida and from San Diego, California to Orono, Maine. He has also received numerous awards for his art installations, which he describes as explorations in meditative and ethereal environments that expand our perceptions of time.

 

ASIA 72-001: Transnational Korea: Literature, Film, and Popular Culture

FY Seminar | TTH, 3:30 PM – 4:45 PM | Instructor(s): Jonathan Kief

Taking the recent Korean Wave phenomenon as its point of departure, this course introduces students to the history of transnational imaginations in modern and contemporary Korean culture. Drawing upon literature, film, television, and secondary scholarship, we will explore how a diverse array of Korean cultural producers have used narratives of cross-border travel, migration, and exchange to rethink Korea’s place in the world and refashion Korean identity. In each section of the course, we will consider a different domain or dimension of border-crossing activity: education; labor; migration and diaspora; North-South interactions; war and military; cosmopolitan imaginings and the making of “global Korea.” In so doing, we will learn to think critically about the relationship between works from colonial Korea, postcolonial North Korea, postcolonial South Korea, and the Korean diaspora, and we will also gain a more nuanced understanding of popular culture’s place within its broader social and historical contexts.

Jonathan Kief

Jonathan Kief is a scholar of modern Korean literature and culture whose research focuses on interactions between words and images in postcolonial North and South Korea. He is also interested in the Korean diaspora, the history of Korean translation practices, and the history of radio and television in Cold War-era East Asia. His teaching combines literature, film, and popular culture to help students explore both the contemporary globalization of Korean culture and the robust history of transnational exchanges that it builds upon. Before moving to North Carolina, he lived in Korea, Japan, and many different parts of the U.S.

 

ASIA 89-001: Love in China

FY Seminar | TTH, 3:30 PM – 4:45 PM | Instructor(s): Keren He

We all know that love is not easy. But what makes it so complicated? This course examines how the Chinese conception of “love” offers a key for us to understand Chinese emotions, family structure, gender and sexuality, consumer desire, as well as political passion. We will probe into these issues through some of the most essential Chinese cultural texts from the 8th century B.C.E. to the 21st century, reading a variety of genres including poetry, fictional narratives, and films. We will also visit the Ackland Art Museum and engage with creative transmedia storytelling, exploring different perspectives to approach primary sources. By the end of the course, you will be able to deconstruct fixed notions about love in the contemporary West, and broaden your perceptions of selfhood, partnership, and community through “love” in the Chinese-speaking world. No prior knowledge of Chinese language and culture is required, and all readings are available in English translation.

Keren He

Keren He specializes in modern Chinese literature, media, and popular culture. Her research focuses on how aging and suicide negotiated “the politics of life” in the Chinese-speaking world. She is also interested in posthumanism, queer theory, and game studies in China and Sinophone regions. She had lived in Beijing, Taipei, and Hong Kong before receiving her Ph.D. at Stanford University.

 

BIOL 101-01F: Principles of Biology

FY Launch | TTH, 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM | Instructor(s): Alaina Garland

This course is the prerequisite to most higher courses in biology. An introduction to the fundamental principles of biology, including cell structure, chemistry, and function; genetics; evolution; adaptation; and ecology. (See department concerning Advanced Placement credit.) Three lecture hours a week.

Alaina Garland

 

BIOL 89-001: Unsolved Problems in the Genomic Age

FY Seminar | TTH, 8:00 AM – 9:15 AM | Instructor(s): Kerry Bloom

We are living in times of a genetic revolution. We have sequenced the human genome and are in a position to transform medical treatment in the world. In spite of the advances in DNA sequencing, there remain mysteries in terms of how the cell accesses genetic information and how our genomes are transmitted to progeny cells with such high fidelity. The principles governing chromosome organization have been discovered through advances in biology, physics, statistics and computational sciences. This class will explore advances from the diverse disciplines and discuss the successes and limitations of the different approaches.

Kerry Bloom

Dr. Kerry Bloom has a long-standing interest in chromosomes. How does the cell pack 2 meters of DNA into a tiny (10 micron) cell. We use a combination of tools including genetics, molecular biology, cell biology, polymer physics, computer simulations and molecular modeling to understand basic mechanisms of chromosome organization and segregation.

 

CHEM 101-01F: General Descriptive Chemistry I

FY Launch | MWF, 9:05 AM – 9:55 AM | Instructor(s): Jillian Dempsey | Lab/Recitation: various REC sections available

Prerequisite, MATH 110. Chemistry 101 is the first half of a yearlong overview of the exciting field of chemistry, the study of the properties and changes of matter and energy. Students will be exposed to many new concepts, techniques and phenomena including atomic and molecular structure, stoichiometry, conservation of mass and energy and thermochemical changes. Chemistry 101 is a pre-requisite for Chemistry 102, and together, Chemistry 101 and 102 are the gateway to all courses in chemistry.

Jillian Dempsey

Professor Jillian Dempsey develops strategies to use sunlight to drive the production of liquid fuels. Liquid solar fuels are expected to be an important component of our future global energy portfolio. In the lab, Professor Dempsey works with undergraduate and graduate students to advance the chemistry crucial to realizing liquid solar fuels. In the classroom, she's passionate about helping draw connections between fundamental chemical concepts and real world applications of chemistry. Professor Dempsey is the Deputy Director of the Center for Hybrid Approaches in Solar Energy to Liquid Fuels (CHASE).

 

CHEM 102-01F: General Descriptive Chemistry II

FY Launch | TTH, 2:00 PM – 3:15 PM | Instructor(s): Domenic John Tiani

CHEM 101 and 101L; C- or better required in CHEM 101 and from community college or AP/IB exam. The General Descriptive Chemistry II course is a continuation of Introduction to College Chemistry (CHEM 101) and considers a range of important and fascinating topics: • How do batteries, which are potential energy in a metal housing, work? • Why does sweating cool us? Why is sweating more effective in a dry desert than in humid North Carolina? How is the same effect achieved when dogs pant? • Why does brining the roads before an ice storm make it safer to travel? How does the salt lower the temperature at which liquid water turns into slippery ice? Why does salt dissolve in water anyway? • How does an enzyme increase the rate of a biochemical reaction? • What is a semiconductor, present in electronics and solar panels, and how is it different from a metal? CHEM 102 is a wonderful course because so many concepts you will learn can be found in real-world examples and will be concepts you would utilize in a range of other disciplines and areas of study, not just chemistry. Bulk properties of gases, liquids and solids, intermolecular forces, solutions and solution behavior, chemical equilibria, spontaneity and Gibbs energy, chemical kinetics and rates of reactions, acid-base chemistry, and electrochemistry. (thermodynamics, chemical kinetics, chemical equilibrium, intermolecular forces, solutions and solution behavior, bulk properties of gases, liquids and solids, acid-base chemistry, and electrochemistry). What is exciting about the First-Year Launch CHEM 102 class is that you will explore how the concepts you are learning in class reveal themselves in the world around you, and in modern research endeavors. In addition, we will build community, examine data and concepts, and develop problem solving and critical thinking skills. One planned activity will be to find examples of the concepts in the news and taking the first 5 minutes of class to share with the rest of the class, whether medically related examples, environmental examples, materials science examples, or other areas that interest you. Unlike regular CHEM 102 classes, we will help you engage with the science in meaningful ways, while also allowing you to learn how scientists think and solve problems. We’ll bring current research into the classroom, whether by interviewing research faculty to learn how they got interested in their area of chemistry and learn about the research they conduct, or attending a research seminar that would have concepts pertinent to class topics, or a research scientist as a guest lecturer. UNC is one of the top research institutions in the world, so we have as a goal to expose all of you to what is happening at UNC. Because the FYL classes are capped at 30 students, a lot like our First-Year Seminar classes and some of our Honors Chemistry classes, students will get to experience a small class environment. The class will become its own community as we explore these concepts together and begin to fill your “toolbox” with those tools that will allow you to be successful in your upper level classes, and be excited about what you are learning. All the introductory chemistry classes at UNC are high structured active learning classes, so we will use evidence-based pedagogical methods to help you master course goals. While introductory chemistry classes can sometimes make students a little nervous, we as a class will be walking this path together to learn, to explore, and to grow in our appreciation of chemistry.

This will be an in-person class with in-person exams; no remote options. The FY Launch section will take their exams during the regular class exam time and not during the common time with all the other CHEM 101 and 102 sections.

Domenic John Tiani

Dr. Domenic Tiani has been teaching at UNC since 2003, teaching a range of courses and labs. Dr. Tiani is an analytical chemist by training, working in the areas of spectroscopy and surface analysis during graduate school. Dr. Tiani was very interested in investigating the chemistry that occurs at interfaces and developing tools to help accomplish those measurements. At UNC he is part of a larger team of term faculty members that focus on chemical education, lab and curriculum development, and improving learning outcomes for students taking chemistry courses. He is committed to helping students be successful in chemistry and provide them with the tools to be prepared for their successive STEM classes. Dr. Tiani is an energetic teacher and a past recipient of The Tanner Award for Undergraduate Teaching at UNC-CH. He was a first-generation college student, as well as a transfer student when he was an undergraduate, so he can relate to a lot of other Carolina Firsts and transfer students he meets at UNC. Dr. Tiani also serves as one of three faculty advisers in the Department of Chemistry, he is a Carolina First Advocate, and a Carolina Covenant Mentor.

 

CHEM 89-001: Bread from Air? The Chemistry of Fertilizers

FY Seminar | TTH, 2:00 PM – 3:15 PM | Instructor(s): Alexander Miller

Fear of a global famine inspired chemist Fritz Haber’s research into the production of ammonia from nitrogen in the air. Following a breakthrough laboratory discovery, engineer Carl Bosch led the development of a large-scale industrial process to produce ammonia… and together they changed the world. This First Year Seminar will introduce concepts of scientific inquiry and interdisciplinary collaboration in the context of the humankind’s utilization of fertilizers. Weaving together elements of plant biology, chemical synthesis and catalysis, environmental science, and technoeconomic analysis, the course will critically examine the past, present, and future of fertilizers.

Alexander Miller

Professor Alexander Miller is fascinated by the ability to control chemical reactivity by altering molecular structures based on transition metal ions. He gets to work with an incredible group of chemists to help apply chemical principles to grand challenges in alternative energy and sustainability, including projects that can underpin the development of light-driven fuel production and sustainable ammonia synthesis. Prof. Miller is an enthusiastic teacher who believes in the power of student-driven discovery. He is an Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellow and was (when he was younger) included in Forbes Magazine’s 30 Under 30 list in the Energy category.

 

CLAS 51H-001: Greek Drama from Page to Stage

FY Seminar | MWF, 9:05 AM – 9:55 AM | Instructor(s): Al Duncan

Taking a participatory approach to ancient Greek drama, this course pairs readings from three Athenian playwrights (Aeschylus, Euripides, and Aristophanes) with performance-oriented activities and scholarship. At its most traditional, this course surveys the historical and cultural context of the so-called “classical” Athens of the fifth-century BCE, emphasizing the political, religious, and aesthetic forces that gave rise to humankind’s first recorded theater. More innovatively, this course probes the dual nature of theater, its distinct but intertwined existences as codified script and socially-embedded performance, through sustained investigations of some of its most influential texts and their modern reception in a global context with case studies focused on post-Apartheid South African and 21st-century Chicanx experiences. Through a variety of original compositions (including Tweets, TikTok/FlipGrid videos, character backstories, stand-up routines, director’s notes, and scholarly analyses), students gain practical experience and theoretical insight into the ways text, performance, and culture interact. Through improvisational activities, recorded videos, and scene rehearsals, students become thespians in their own right, pressing the limits of how far performance might extend beyond the traditional stage. Class trips to Davis Library, the Forest Theater, and live performances introduce first-year students to some of the academic and cultural resources UNC offers.

Al Duncan

Al Duncan is Assistant Professor in the Department of Classics. He holds a B.A. in English and Classical Languages & Literature from the University of Michigan, and a Ph.D. in Classics and the Humanities from Stanford University. Having previously taught in Classics and Comparative Literature at the University at Utah, he joined the Carolina faculty in 2015, where he teaches a variety of courses on ancient Greek language and literature and ancient Mediterranean culture. Professor Duncan’s research focuses on theatrical production, aesthetics, and genre. He is currently preparing a book on ugliness in Greek drama, as well as several chapters and articles on the material and cognitive aspects of ancient theater.

 

CLAS 57H-001: Dead and Deadly Women: Greek Tragic Heroines from Aeschylus to Eliot

FY Seminar | TTH, 12:30 PM – 1:45 PM | Instructor(s): Sharon James

In this course, we will study the great tragic heroines of ancient Greek drama, focusing on Clytemnestra, Medea, Alcestis, Phaedra, the Trojan Women, Antigone. We will also read a contemporary novel, by Fay Weldon, that engages many of these mythic women. We will studythe Greek tragedies intensively, along with their reception in later art, from paintings to poems, stage productions to sculptures, operas to ballets. Our questions will include: why does Greek tragedy focus so intensely on women? Are the playwrights misogynists or do they express some sympathy for women? What about these female characters grabbed the imaginations not only of ancient Greek playwrights but of later writers, painters, composers, not to mention readers? How are their stories relevant to the 21st century? Did the ancient Athenians know something we don’t?

Sharon James

Professor Sharon James specializes in Roman comedy, Latin poetry, and women in ancient Greece and Rome. She has published many articles on these subjects, as well as a book on Roman love elegy (published in 2003); she is currently preparing a large-scale book on women in Greek and Roman New Comedy (the plays of Menander, Plautus, and Terence). She is also the co-editor of Blackwell’s Companion to Women in the Ancient World (published 2012). Professor James regularly teaches all these subjects at both the undergraduate and graduate levels. Her lecture courses, CLAS/WMST 240/240H (Women in Ancient Greece) and CLAS/WMST 241/241H (Women in Ancient Rome) are cross-listed between Classics and Women’s Studies. In summer 2012 she co-directed an NEH Institute on the performance of Roman comedy. In 2013, she won the University’s William C. Friday/Class of 1986 Award for Excellence in Inspirational Teaching; in 2021, she won the Board of Governors Award for Excellence in Teaching.

 

CLAS 59-001: Ancient Magic and Religion

FY Seminar | MWF, 12:20 PM – 1:10 PM | Instructor(s): Suzanne Lye

Bindings and curses, love charms and healing potions, amulets and talismans – from simple spells to complex group rituals, ancient societies made use of both magic and religion to try to influence the world around them. In this course, we shall examine the roles of magic and religion in the ancient Greek
and Roman worlds, paying special attention to their local contexts and to the myths and actual techniques ancient practitioners used to serve their clientele.

In this class, we examine descriptions of religious and magical practices in the multicultural contexts of ancient Greece and Rome. Our sources include literary accounts, legal documents, and material objects, such as inscriptions, amulets, tablets, magical images, and papyri. Additionally, instruction for this class incorporates a combination of locations and technologies, including the the BeAM Makerspaces, the Greenlaw Gameroom, and the Ackland Art Museum. During the course of the term, students will be expected to analyze ancient literature and material artifacts, construct replicas of ancient objects, and explore reconstructions of the ancient Greco-Roman world in video games.

Suzanne Lye

Suzanne Lye received her A.B. from Harvard University, where she studied organic chemistry and the history of antibiotics. After receiving her Ph.D. in Classics from the University of California, Los Angeles, she was awarded a Postdoctoral Fellowship at Dartmouth College. At present, she is working on a book-length project about conceptions of the afterlife in ancient Greek Underworld narratives from Homer to Lucian. She has also participated in several digital humanities initiatives through Harvard’s Center for Hellenic Studies, including the Homer Multitext Project. She has published on ancient epic, ancient religion and magic, ancient representations of gender and ethnicity, modern pedagogy, and Classical reception.

 

CMPL 62-001: Curiosity and the Birth of the Imagination

FY Seminar | MWF, 10:10 AM – 11:00 AM | Instructor(s): Marsha S. Collins

Today we tend to see curiosity and imagination as two peas in a very positive pod. Yet, although they have often been linked together, neither curiosity nor the imagination has always been viewed in such a favorable light. Pandora’s curiosity supposedly unleashed all ills and calamities upon the world. In the sixteenth century, Michel de Montaigne famously called the imagination a “runaway horse” and asserted that the imagination brings fevers and death to those who give it a free hand and encourage it. How did we get from Pandora’s calamitous curiosity and Montaigne’s death-dealing imagination to Epcot Center’s gleeful celebration of curiosity and the imagination? In this course, we will seek answers to this question by looking back in time to the thought and literature of classical antiquity and Early Modern Europe–to writings by Plato, Lucian, Cervantes, Shakespeare, and others.

Marsha S. Collins

Marsha S. Collins is a Professor of Comparative Literature.  Her research focuses on Early Modern Spanish Literature and Culture in the context of Early Modern Europe, Literature and the Visual Arts, and Idealizing Forms of Literature. She is the author of three books, over thirty articles, and is currently writing a book on friendship and community in Cervantes’s Don Quixote. She loves dogs, yoga, piano, travel, being at the ocean, and spending time with family and friends.

 

COMM 140-01F: Introduction to Media History, Theory, and Criticism

FY Launch | MWF, 11:15 AM – 12:05 PM | Instructor(s): David Monje

An introduction to the critical analysis of film, television, advertising, video, and new media texts, contexts, and audiences.

David Monje

Dr. David Monje’s research and teaching interests are in the environment, art, aesthetics and politics. He has travelled widely pursuing these interests and brings a broad perspective to the class. His interdisciplinary approach to teaching is informed by his education: he has BFA in painting, a BA in Linguistics, an MA in Communication and Society, and Ph.D. in Cultural Studies and Communication.

 

COMM 170-01F: Rhetoric and Public Issues

FY Launch | TTH, 12:30 PM – 1:45 PM | Instructor(s): Cori Dauber

Examines the basic nature and importance of rhetoric and argumentation. Attention is devoted to interpreting the persuasive function of texts and their relation to modern forms of life.

Cori Dauber

Dr. Cori E. Dauber (@coridauber) is Professor of Communication at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where she is also a Research Fellow at the Triangle Institute for Security Studies (TISS.) She is co-editor of Visual Propaganda and Extremism in the Online Environment (US Army War College Press, 2014), and the author of You Tube War: Fighting in a World of Cameras in Every Cell Phone and Photoshop on Every Computer (US Army War College Press, 2010). She has been the Visiting Research Professor at the Strategic Studies Institute of the US Army War College. Her research focus is the communication strategies of terrorist groups, with a particular focus on their use of visual imagery. Her work has been published in venues such as Military Review, Armed Forces & Society, Rhetoric & Public Affairs, and Jihadology.net, and she has presented her research to the Canadian Forces College, the John Kennedy School for Special Warfare, the Council on Foreign Relations, and the NATO Communication and Information Conference among others. Dr. Dauber holds a Ph.D. and BS from Northwestern University, and an MA from Chapel Hill, all in Communication Studies.

 

COMM 63-001: The Creative Process in Performance

FY Seminar | MW, 1:25 PM – 2:40 PM | Instructor(s): Joseph Megel

Students in this seminar will attend and study the production process of multimedia, music, dance and theater performances on campus and on-line. The Process Series of the Performance Studies program in the Department of Communication Studies, Playmakers, Carolina Performing Arts, and others across campus and additional on-line performance. We will discuss how performance as it was experienced (pre-Covid) and as it currently experienced. We will examine performance through multiple lenses, from Aristotle’s Poetics, Peter Brooks’s Empty Space, up to current writing from Performance Studies scholars. We will explore the ways that performances engage us, communicating powerful ideas and emotions through their various media of expression. Students will research performance pieces, interview the performers, attend rehearsals and performances, and write essays that combine their own experiences of the performances with class readings. Students will also create their own performance pieces as they observe the relationship of preparation and practice to the spontaneity and surprise of performance.

Joseph Megel

Joseph Megel has spent the last 20 years focusing on the direction and development of new works, for theatre, film and video. Mr. Megel is a member of SSDC (Society of Stage Directors and Choreographers), Co-Artistic Director of StreetSigns Center for Literature and Performance in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, and an Associate Artist for The Working Theatre in New York. He holds the M.F.A. degree from the Peter Stark Motion Picture Producing Program at the University of Southern California, a Master of Arts from the University of Cincinnati’s College Conservatory of Music and a B.S. in Speech from Northwestern University. He served for six years as Artistic Director of Playwrights Theatre of New Jersey, a new play development theatre, and continues to serve as Co-Executive Producer of Harland’s Creek Productions, producer of New York premieres of new plays, developmental producer of screenplays, readings and films.

 

COMP 89-084: Computing All Around Us

FY Seminar | MW, 11:15 AM – 12:30 PM | Instructor(s): Parasara Sridhar Duggirala

The majority of computing devices are not inside personal computers, laptops, or in data centers. Instead, they are integrated into multiple objects around us. From the small computers integrated into water taps that automatically shut off when not in use to the integrated computers assessing the health of jet engines, these computers are pervasive and impact several walks of life. In this course, we study such embedded devices. We first investigate the various applications of such embedded computing systems in our day to day lives. We then understand the design principles behind these embedded devices by studying the design constraints and the possible space of solutions. Finally, we will pick a specific application of interest and design an embedded system for that application.

Parasara Sridhar Duggirala

Parasara Sridhar Duggirala is an Assistant Professor in the Computer Science Department at University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. His research interest are in designing safe autonomous systems, techniques for rigorously proving properties of software systems, and embedded and real-time systems. He teaches undergraduate students how to write proofs without making them seem too daunting. He has mentored several undergraduate students in building miniature autonomous vehicles and has participated and won a couple of autonomous vehicle racing competitions. He sometimes entertains his students by integrating memes into lectures, juggling in class, and reciting a ridiculous number of digits of pi.

 

DRAM 120-01F: Play Analysis

FY Launch | TTH, 9:30 AM – 10:45 AM | Instructor(s): Mark Perry

Development of the skill to analyze plays for academic and production purposes through the intensive study of representative plays. DRAM 120 is the first course in the major and the minor in dramatic art.

Mark Perry

Mark Perry teaches playwriting, play analysis and dramaturgy and serves as a resident dramaturg with PlayMakers Repertory Company. His plays A New Dress for Mona and The Will of Bernard Boynton have been produced by UNC’s Department of Dramatic Art, and both scripts are available from Drama Circle. Mark is a graduate of the University of Iowa’s Playwrights Workshop and a former recipient of the North Carolina Arts Council’s Literature Fellowship for playwriting.

 

DRAM 79-001: The Heart of the Play: Fundamentals of Acting, Playwriting, and Collaboration

FY Seminar | MW, 11:15 AM – 12:30 PM | Instructor(s): Mark Perry

The goal of this seminar is to get you doing theatre, to spark your creativity and to connect you with the deeper lessons of this dynamic art form. You will act. You will write. You will work with others. It will not always be easy, but if you are willing to stretch yourself, you should have a great time. Each lesson is organized around a principle or virtue inherent in the practice of the art. Participants study a quotation or two that relate to that principle and then engage in drama exercises that spring from that principle. By the end of the course, you will have gained skills to make you comfortable to write, stage and perform your own 10 minute plays. Not just for those interested in pursuing theatre, this seminar will give you a more holistic understanding of essential principles in the practice of your life.

Mark Perry

Mark Perry teaches playwriting, play analysis and dramaturgy and serves as a resident dramaturg with PlayMakers Repertory Company. His plays A New Dress for Mona and The Will of Bernard Boynton have been produced by UNC’s Department of Dramatic Art, and both scripts are available from Drama Circle. Mark is a graduate of the University of Iowa’s Playwrights Workshop and a former recipient of the North Carolina Arts Council’s Literature Fellowship for playwriting.

 

DRAM 81H-001: Staging America: The American Drama

FY Seminar | TTH, 2:00 PM – 3:15 PM | Instructor(s): Gregory Kable

This seminar examines our national drama from its colonial origins to the present. Participants read plays and criticism, screen videos, engage in critical writing, and consider performance as related means of exploring the visions and revisions constituting American dramatic history. We will approach American drama as both a literary and commercial art form, and look to its history to provide a context for current American theater practice. Readings are chosen for their intrinsic merit and historical importance, but also for their treatment of key issues and events in American life. Our focus throughout will be on the forces that shaped the American drama as well as, in turn, that drama’s ability to shed light on the national experience.

Gregory Kable

Gregory Kable is a Teaching Professor in the Department of Dramatic Art, where he teaches dramatic literature, theatre history, and performance courses and serves as an Associate Dramaturg for PlayMakers Repertory Company. He also teaches seminars on Modern British Drama and American Musicals for the Honors program. He has directed dozens of productions at UNC and throughout the local community, and is a graduate of the Yale School of Drama.

 

DRAM 83-001: Spectacle in the Theatre

FY Seminar | TTH, 9:30 AM – 10:45 AM | Instructor(s): David Navalinsky

This seminar will explore the artists, art and technology involved in creating the world of the play. It is intended as an overview for students who want to learn about theatrical design. Students will create their own designs in the areas of scenery, costumes, and lighting for three plays throughout the semester. The plays will be placed outside of their traditional setting while still maintaining the story and themes. Students have placed Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream in a trailer park and a daycare center for example. Careful historical research, close reading and analysis, text and source material, and collaboration will be the focus of the student projects.

David Navalinsky

David Navalinsky is the Director of Undergraduate Production in the Department of Dramatic Art. David has taught at the University of Texas at Arlington and the University of Mississippi. David’s recent design work includes scenery for The Uncanny Valley by Francesca Talenti. The Uncanny Valley featured a Robothespian™, which is exactly what it sounds like. He has also written a documentary theatre piece Priceless Gem: An Athlete Story, which tells the stories of UNC athletes. David has worked professionally at South Coast Repertory in Orange County California, The Utah Shakespeare Festival, The Illinois Shakespeare Festival, and the Karamu Performing Arts Theatre in Cleveland, OH. Some of David’s favorite projects were at the Dallas Children’s Theater where he made a dinosaur collapse and pirates walk the plank.

 

ECON 101H-01F: Introduction to Economics

FY Launch | MWF, 1:25 PM – 2:15 PM | Instructor(s): Rita Balaban | Lab/Recitation: ECON 101H-601

Introduction to fundamental issues in economics including competition, scarcity, opportunity cost, resource allocation, unemployment, inflation, and the determination of prices.

Rita Balaban

Rita Balaban is a Teaching Professor in the Department of Economics at UNC-Chapel Hill where she has been a faculty member since 2006. She earned her Ph.D. from the Department of Economics at the University of Pittsburgh in 1999 and prior to her arrival at UNC-CH, she taught at Samford University and the College of Charleston. Rita is an experienced teacher whose teaching interests are in Applied Microeconomics, specifically the Economics of Sports. She has won several university-wide teaching awards including the Chapman Family Award (201) and the Tanner Award (2015) for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching. Her research interests are in economics pedagogy and she has presented her work at conferences in Wilmington, Philadelphia and San Diego.

 

ENGL 129-01F: Literature and Cultural Diversity

FY Launch | TTH, 3:30 PM – 4:45 PM | Instructor(s): Søren G. Palmer

Fulfills a major core requirement. Studies in African American, Asian American, Hispanic American, Native American, Anglo-Indian, Caribbean, gay-lesbian, and other literatures written in English.

Søren G. Palmer

Søren G. Palmer’s work has appeared in Barely South Review, Ecotone, Huffington Post, North American Review and been shortlisted for the Flannery O’Connor Award for Short Fiction. He holds an MTS from Vanderbilt Divinity School, an MFA in Creative Writing from Arizona State and a PhD in English and Comparative Literature from the University of Cincinnati. He lives in Durham with his wife and three dogs.

 

ENGL 66-001: Blake 2.0: William Blake in Popular Culture

FY Seminar | TTH, 9:30 AM – 10:45 AM | Instructor(s): Joseph Viscomi

William Blake, the visionary poet, artist and printmaker of the British Romantic period, has had enormous influence on modern art and popular culture. His illuminated poetry integrated word and image anticipating graphic novels and influencing many modern musicians, poets, writers (including Pullman, His Dark Materials Trilogy, Bono, Patti Smith and Jim Morrison). Using the Blake Archive, a hypertext of Blake’s poetry and art, we will study key Blake works as well as the digital medium that enables us to study these works in new ways. We will also explore the Web for performances and adaptations of the works we study and for works by musicians, painters, poets, writers, actors, playwrights, performers, dancers and film and video makers who were or are inspired or influenced by Blake. Students will share their discoveries with the class and produce critical or creative responses to a work by Blake or by an influenced artist.

Joseph Viscomi

Joseph Viscomi, the James G. Kenan Distinguished Professor of English Literature, directs and co-edits the William Blake Archive blakearchive.org. His special interests are British Romantic literature, art, and printmaking. He has co-edited 9 illuminated works for The William Blake Trust and over 172 electronic editions of Blakes literary and art works for the Blake Archive. He is the author of Prints by Blake and his Followers, Blake and the Idea of the Book, and Blake’s Printed Paintings: Methods, Origins, Meanings. He has received fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, National Endowment for the Humanities, Rockefeller Foundation, Getty Foundation, and the National Humanities Center.

 

ENGL 74-001: Epic/Anti-Epic in Western Literature

FY Seminar | TTH, 2:00 PM – 3:15 PM | Instructor(s): Jessica Wolfe

In this course, students will study epic and anti-epic strains in Western literature, reading key texts in the epic tradition from Homer and Virgil through the 20th century in light of various challenges to that tradition and tensions within it.

Jessica Wolfe

Jessica Wolfe (Marcel Bataillon Professor of English and Comparative Literature) has taught at UNC for two decades, principally as a scholar of the intellectual and literary history of the English and European Renaissance (ca. 1450-1700). Her research focuses on the history of science (or “natural philosophy”) from ancient Greece through the late seventeenth century, on topics ranging from unicorns and glow-worms to early writings on magnetism and electricity, mechanics, and the science of the soul.

 

ENGL 89-002: Human Rights and Literature

FY Seminar | TTH, 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM | Instructor(s): Stephanie Degooyer

In this class we will investigate the history of human rights from the perspective of literature. We will explore how rights are represented and narrated in novels such as Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein and how founding declarations—famously, the Declaration of Independence (1776), the Declaration of the Rights of Man and Citizen (1789), and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (1948)—rely on fictional structures. While attending to some of the more politically contentious issues involved with human rights, such as the claim that universal rights lack political and legal enforcement, we will also consider the following questions: how does fiction help articulate and represent claims to human rights? Why might a political philosopher or legal scholar turn to a work of fiction from the eighteenth century or present day in order to make an argument about human rights? Alongside theoretical and historical writings about human rights we will read authors such as Hannah Arendt, Edmund Burke, Behrouz Boochani, Mahatma Gandhi, Thomas Hobbes, Mohsin Hamid, Thomas Paine, Mary Shelley, and Mary Wollstonecraft.

Stephanie Degooyer

Stephanie Degooyer’s research examines intersections between law and literature, with interests in immigration, migration, history of disease and global health, and human rights and humanitarianism. She teaches classes on law and literature, transatlantic and colonial literature, Medical Humanities, and theories and history of the novel. Stephanie Degooyer’s forthcoming book, Acts of Naturalization, (JHUP, 2022) looks to the legal process of naturalization in the long eighteenth century to argue for a new fictional conception of nationality in early modernity. She is currently working on two projects: Asylum Nation: Refugees and the Founding of America, which traces the colonial history of legal concepts such as “asylum” and “refugees” in British common law and early American legal and literary history, and a book project on the history and social function of unidentified bodily remains. She is co-author of The Right to Have Rights (Verso Books, 2018), and co-editor of The Routledge Companion to the Novel (forthcoming 2023). She has written on a variety of topics – immigration, borders, vaccines, disease, and literature – for The Nation, Guardian, Dissent, Boston Review, Lapham’s Quarterly, Humanity, Los Angeles Review of Books, and Public Books.

 

ENGL 89H-001: American Poetry in Motion

FY Seminar | TTH, 12:30 PM – 1:45 PM | Instructor(s): Eliza Richards

This course focuses on the creative processes involved in writing poetry. We will look at poets’ revisions of their work, their statements about poetry, their letters to and from other writers, and the publication and reception of their poems in their own time. We will concentrate on specific case studies: the manuscripts and letter-poems of the reclusive writer Emily Dickinson; the notebooks, letters, and poems of Walt Whitman that he wrote while tending the wounded in the Civil War hospitals; the poems, manuscripts, and letters of George Moses Horton, who taught himself to read and write and published two books of poetry while enslaved in North Carolina; and the drafts, revisions, and animal drawings of twentieth-century modernist Marianne Moore. The course seeks to develop close reading skills that are crucial for interpreting poetry; to explore how social and cultural conditions both limit and enable poetic expression, and how poets analyze and criticize those conditions; to strengthen writing and oral communication skills; and to develop research skills.

Eliza Richards

Eliza Richards is a Professor in the Department of English and Comparative Literature. She teaches American literature before 1900 and American poetry. She has written about Edgar Allan Poe, Walt Whitman, Emily Dickinson, the poetry of the US Civil War, and popular women’s poetry. Professor Richards has won awards for teaching on both the graduate and undergraduate level.

 

ENGL 89H-002: The Machine Mistake from Frankenstein to the Smartphone 

FY Seminar | MWF, 11:15 AM – 12:05 PM | Instructor(s): David A. Ross

There is the assumption that science fiction propagandizes for the gleaming gadgetry that it depicts. It’s true that science fiction often endorses the scientific endeavor and worldview. It’s further true that the science fictionists of the 1940s and 1950s tended to pine for the space age that began in 1969. But even at its giddiest and wonkiest, science fiction remembers the lesson of Frankenstein. It remembers that our monsters develop ideas of their own; that they wind up haunting us and even hunting us; that our innovations—however seemingly benign—however fenced and fail-safe—threaten to escape our control and our comprehension. This course traces the genealogy of this machine anxiety. Our guiding questions will be: What are machines? Does the artificially intelligent “machine” cease to be a machine? Are machines “natural” or “unnatural”? Are they heretical? Are their dangers inherent? How do they change us?

Our course epigraph might paraphrase Winston Churchill: We shape our machines; thereafter they shape us.

David A. Ross

Dr. David A. Ross is a graduate of Yale and Oxford. He has been a member of the Department of English & Comparative Literature at UNC–Chapel Hill since 2002. He is the author of A Critical Companion to William Butler Yeats (2009) and the co-editor/co-translator of The Search for the Avant-Garde, 1946¬–1969 (2012), the descriptive catalogue of the Taipei Fine Arts Museum. A collector and dilettante scholar of traditional Chinese painting, he has served as president of Southeast Conference of the Association for Asian Studies and as both editor and book review editor of the Southeast Review of Asian Studies.

 

ENVR 89-001: Environment-ECUIPP Lab: Connecting with Communities through Environmental Research for Public Health

FY Seminar | TTH, 9:30 AM – 10:45 AM | Instructor(s): Amanda Northcross

This course is an entry into an undergraduate learning community organized by the Gillings School of Global Public Health, Department of Environmental Science and Engineering. The ECUIPP Lab (Environmentally-Engaged Communities and Undergraduate students Investigating for Public health Protection) is a creative community of students, faculty members and practice partners. Students in ENVR 89-001 will become members of the Environment-ECUIPP Lab. Over the course of the semester they will design and conduct research that addresses a pressing environmental health issue in a local community. Students will work with the local community partner to develop a research question and use the resources of the ECUIPP Lab and the Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering to answer the question through the research process. The course is a hands-on undergraduate research experience

Amanda Northcross

Prof. Amanda Northcross likes to build things and enjoys working together with students and communities to explore environmental health concerns, design field campaigns, and build and deploy networks of sensors to answer environmental health questions. With BS, MS and PhD degrees in chemical and environmental engineering she is passionate about health equity. Dr. Northcross has conducted environmental health and engineering research in Guatemala, Brazil, Nigeria and the United States. She will work together with faculty from UNC’s Water Institute to conduct community-engaged environmental research with first year students.

 

ENVR 89-002: Environment-ECUIPP Lab: Connecting with Communities through Environmental Research for Public Health

FY Seminar | TTH, 12:30 PM – 1:45 PM | Instructor(s): Amanda Northcross

This course is an entry into an undergraduate learning community organized by the Gillings School of Global Public Health, Department of Environmental Science and Engineering. The ECUIPP Lab (Environmentally-Engaged Communities and Undergraduate students Investigating for Public health Protection) is a creative community of students, faculty members and practice partners. Students in ENVR 89-001 will become members of the Environment-ECUIPP Lab. Over the course of the semester they will design and conduct research that addresses a pressing environmental health issue in a local community. Students will work with the local community partner to develop a research question and use the resources of the ECUIPP Lab and the Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering to answer the question through the research process. The course is a hands-on undergraduate research experience.

Amanda Northcross

Prof. Amanda Northcross likes to build things and enjoys working together with students and communities to explore environmental health concerns, design field campaigns, and build and deploy networks of sensors to answer environmental health questions. With BS, MS and PhD degrees in chemical and environmental engineering she is passionate about health equity. Dr. Northcross has conducted environmental health and engineering research in Guatemala, Brazil, Nigeria and the United States. She will work together with faculty from UNC’s Water Institute to conduct community-engaged environmental research with first year students.

 

FREN 65-001: La mode: Fashion in French Culture

FY Seminar | MW, 1:25 PM – 2:40 PM | Instructor(s): Ellen Welch

French culture and fashion have been synonymous since the age of Louis XIV. This is not only because Paris traditionally occupied the center of the global fashion industry. It’s also because fashion has a respected place in French culture. This seminar investigates what fashion has meant to French-speaking writers, artists, and philosophers through the centuries. We will explore key episodes in the history of French fashion from the emergence of the idea of fashion in the seventeenth century, to Marie-Antoinette’s role as fashion icon, to the birth of haute couture in the 20th century, to contemporary debates about fashion’s impact on the environment and global economy. Along the way, we will discover how French thinkers have interpreted the allure and significance of fashion from multiple perspectives. In short, we will consider what it means to take fashion seriously. This seminar will take place in English. No knowledge of French is required (although French speakers are very welcome!).

Ellen Welch

Ellen Welch is a Professor in the French & Francophone Studies program where she teaches on French cultural history, literature, and theater and performance. A specialist of Ancien Régime France, she has written books on the history of exoticism in French literature and on the role of the performing arts (especially ballet) in early modern diplomacy. She holds a PhD from the University of Pennsylvania and a BA from Brown University, where working on an honors thesis sparked the passion for research that she now enjoys sharing with UNC undergrads.

 

GEOG 52-001: Political Ecology of Health and Disease

FY Seminar | TTH, 2:00 PM – 3:15 PM | Instructor(s): Michael Emch

This course examines the ecology of infectious diseases including environmental and anthropogenic drivers of those diseases. During the semester we will focus on several case studies of diseases including COVID-19, malaria, cholera, and HIV/AIDS. The biophysical and evolutionary drivers of diseases will be examined as well as the political, economic, social, and environmental systems that shape health and disease across spatial and temporal scales. A political ecological framework is used to examine such topics as how political forces and economic interests helped shape the HIV/AIDS and malaria pandemics in Africa and beyond. We will also examine how emerging infectious diseases such as COVID-19 diffuse through populations and how public health efforts and geographical and epidemiological modelling and analyses can be used to predict and limit their spread.

Michael Emch

Michael Emch is W.R. Kenan, Jr. Distinguished Professor of Geography and Epidemiology at UNC. His expertise is in infectious disease ecology, spatial epidemiology, neighborhood determinants of health, and geographic information science applications of public health. He leads the Spatial Health Research Group which conducts research that explores spatio-temporal patterns of disease, primarily infectious diseases of the developing world. His research group focuses on diverse topics such as the role of population-environment drivers in pathogen evolution, how social connectivity contributes to disease incidence, and using environmental indicators to predict disease outbreaks. For more information see the Spatial Health Research Group website at spatialhealth.web.unc.edu/.

 

GEOG 67-001: Politics of Everyday Life

FY Seminar | TTH, 9:30 AM – 10:45 AM | Instructor(s): Sara Smith

This seminar examines the ways that politics, especially contests over territory, are part of our day-to-day life. We will explore a range of cases, from immigration policy and rhetoric in the US, to popular representations of geopolitics in film, to the politics of family planning in India. How do questions of love, friendship, family and youth identity tie into the international and national political stories that we see on the news? What does national identity have to do with our individual sense of self? We will also explore alternative ways that international politics have been studied, as feminist geopolitics or anti-geopolitics and questions of citizenship. Work for the seminar will involve original research on intersections of international politics and students’ daily life, as well as exploring representations of geopolitical issues in the media, film and fiction.

Sara Smith

Sara Smith is a political geographer with a South Asia focus, specializing in feminist political geography and political geographies of youth and the future. She has been involved in non-profit work and research in India since 1999. Her Ph.D. is in geography, and she has been teaching in UNC’s Department of Geography since 2009. Professor Smith’s current research in the Ladakh region of India’s Jammu and Kashmir State addresses the ways that individuals’ personal lives (especially their decisions about love and babies) are entangled in territorial struggle. Smith is developing a new project about how marginalized young people from India’s remote mountain regions experience university life in major Indian cities and how this shapes their politics. If you are curious, you can find out more about this work on her faculty website: https://sarasmith.web.unc.edu/.

 

GEOG 89-001: Freshwaters in the Anthropocene

FY Seminar | MWF, 9:05 AM – 9:55 AM | Instructor(s): Amanda DelVecchia

Freshwaters sustain myriad ecosystem services by providing drinking water, irrigation, inland fisheries, transportation, recreational opportunities, nutrient cycling, and biodiversity. At the same time, both water quality and quantity are impacted by land use, water abstraction, damming, contamination, and climate change. This seminar will focus (1) on understanding how these anthropogenic pressures affect freshwater ecosystems differently across ecoregions, and (2) how management, legislative, and social initiatives have adapted or developed solutions. We will focus mainly on the United States but consider case studies from around the world. Students should be prepared to read and discuss three materials per week. These reading materials will include a range of popular media including podcasts, newspaper articles, and book chapters, as well as scientific articles and overviews. We will also spend some time exploring and talking about streams accessible to the UNC campus. Class will culminate with research projects in which students get to explore a topic of their choice and presenting findings to their peers.

Amanda DelVecchia

I am a physical geographer focusing on freshwater ecosystem ecology and biogeochemistry. This involves connecting various spatial and temporal scales, and biotic and abiotic factors, within groundwater, lakes, wetlands, rivers, and their watersheds. In particular, I ask how connectivity between different parts of the landscape (including those we cannot see!), and over time, affect functions like carbon and nutrient cycling, food webs, and greenhouse gas dynamics. By understanding these connections, we can better predict how freshwaters react to climate change and anthropogenic alteration, so that we may better protect freshwater biodiversity and function. I use a mix of empirical and data science, and work across the U.S. and internationally. You can learn more about my research by visiting my website at amandadelvecchia.weebly.com, by emailing me, or by visiting during my office hours, in which case I can promise you a warm reception and an offer for tea.

 

GEOL 101-01F: Planet Earth

FY Launch | TTH, 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM | Instructor(s): Michelle Haskin

This course will introduce geological concepts through the lens of U.S. national parks and a plate tectonic framework. The course will take a small-group approach to in-class work where developing collaboration and communication skills will be a focus. Students will apply their talents, skills, knowledge, and creativity to investigate related topics of interest as they manifest in a specific U.S. National Park to examine the interconnectedness of the geologic sciences and other fields of study. They will present their work in a manner appropriate to their project. Because this course is geared toward students newer to the university environment, the course will also discuss adjacent issues relevant to first-year students such as studying approaches, professionalism, as well as usefulness of meta-cognition, self-reflection, and feedback. Students will practice employing these ideas and approaches though individual and small-group work. Optional laboratory: GEOL 101L.

Michelle Haskin

Michelle Haskin is an Assistant Teaching Professor who strives to facilitate undergraduate learning through equitable pedagogical practices and collaborative learning. She has an interest in metacognition and applying learning strategies to help students discover new ways to approach and reframe their learning. She has taught over 2300 UNC students and looks forward to teaching many more.

 

GEOL 72H-001: Field Geology of Eastern California

FY Seminar | TTH, 2:00 PM – 3:15 PM | Instructor(s): Drew Coleman

Have you ever wanted to stand on a volcano, see a glacier, trace out an earthquake fault, or see the Earth’s oldest living things? This seminar is designed around a one-week field trip to eastern California, where students will study geologic features including active volcanoes, earthquake-producing faults, and evidence for recent glaciation and extreme climate change. Before the field trip (which will take place the week of Fall Break and be based at a research station near Bishop, California), the class will meet twice a week to learn basic geologic principles and to work on developing field research topics. During the field trip students will work on field exercises (e.g. mapping, measuring, and describing an active fault; observing and recording glacial features) and collect data for the research projects. After the field trip, students will obtain laboratory data from samples collected during the trip and test research hypotheses using field and laboratory data. Grading will be based on presentation of group research projects, and on a variety of small projects during the trip (notebook descriptions, mapping projects, etc.). Students may be required to pay some of the costs of the trip (a maximum of about $500.) This course will require missing three days of classes. The course is designed to teach basic geology “on the rocks”, so there are no prerequisites. Link to Yosemite Nature Notes video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y5RQp77uVPA

Drew Coleman

Drew Coleman’s research focuses on understanding how the Earth works by determining the rates of processes (mountain building, extinction, volcanism, etc.) that occurred in the past. To accomplish this he and his students date rocks. His teaching is inquiry based and he is most happy when he is teaching “hands on” in the field or lab.

 

GSLL 56-001: Germans, Jews, and the History of Anti-Semitism

FY Seminar | TTH, 12:30 PM – 1:45 PM | Instructor(s): Adi Nester | Same as: JWST 56-001

This seminar offers first-year students an introduction to the German-Jewish experience and the history of anti-semitism in Germany, from early modernity to the present day. Students in this seminar will learn to analyze a variety of texts (both literary and philosophical), musical works, and films in relation to the history of Jews in German-speaking countries, and will be able to apply their knowledge to their analysis of present-day manifestations of antisemitism and xenophobia in Germany. The course has no requisites and presumes no prior knowledge of the subject matter.

Adi Nester

Adi Nester received her Ph.D. in German Studies from the University of Colorado Boulder and holds additional degrees in Musicology and Piano Performance from the Hebrew University in Jerusalem and the University of Southern California. She joined the department of Germanic and Slavic Languages and Literatures at UNC in fall 2020. Adi’s research focuses on German-Jewish Studies and the intersection of literature, music, theology, and politics in the cultures and traditions of German-speaking countries.

 

GSLL 80-001: Not Just Dogs: Animals in Russian Literature

FY Seminar | TTH, 12:30 PM – 1:45 PM | Instructor(s): Radislav Lapushin

This seminar explores the “question of the animal” in the works of major Russian writers (Gogol, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Turgenev, Chekhov) and introduces students to the main theoretical texts on the animal/human relationship (Nietzsche, Levinas, Derrida, Irigaray). Among the topics to be discussed are the animal as the other, animal and human natures, dominance and submission, ethics of the human/animal relations, and the theme of “talking” animals.

Radislav Lapushin

Radislav Lapushin, Associate Professor of Russian Literature, received his Ph.D. from the University of Chicago. His primary research interests are Chekhov; interrelationship between prose and poetry; and Russian literature on stage and screen. His well-received book, Dew on the Grass: The Poetics of Inbetweenness in Chekhov, focuses on the poetic dimensions of Anton Chekhov’s prose and drama. An author of several volumes of Russian poetry, his most recent collection, Dog Poetry (Boston, 2016), dovetails nicely with the topic of this seminar.

 

HIST 51-001: Latin American Revolutions

FY Seminar | TTH, 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM | Instructor(s): Miguel La Serna

This seminar explores the problem of revolutionary upheaval in Latin American history. Why did people like Simón Bolívar, Pancho Villa, Che Guevara, and Fidel Castro take up arms, and what has been the impact of the insurgencies they helped lead? This explores these and other questions by examining the various causes, manifestations, and outcomes of revolutionary violence in modern Latin American history. Students will develop their interpretive skills through a close reading of English-language primary sources from the wars of the independence to the guerrilla insurgencies of the late-20th century. The seminar begins with an exploration of the wars of independence (1810-1825). Students will then analyze the twentieth-century revolutions in Mexico (1910-1917), Cuba (1953-1959), and Nicaragua (1979). The course concludes with an exploration of the late-20th century guerrilla insurgencies of the Shining Path (Peru), FARC (Colombia), and Zapatistas (Mexico).

Miguel La Serna

Miguel La Serna is interested in exploring the contours of Latin American revolutions and counterinsurgencies. He is currently working on two projects about the political violence in 1980s and 1990s Peru. The first is a narrative history of Shining Path, and the second is a history of the Tupac Amaru Revolutionary Movement.

 

HIST 62-001: Nations, Borders, and Identities

FY Seminar | TTH, 12:30 PM – 1:45 PM | Instructor(s): Sarah Shields

Rally around the Flag! Leaders’ calls to action on behalf of the nation has led to common action against invasion, disaster, and disease. The same exhortation has preceded aggression, exclusion, and hostility. How have people defined their collective identities? What roles do borders have in separating–and creating–nations? What kinds of other identities motivate people, and why do we assume it is nationalism that dominates history? We will use a variety of historical sources to analyze the ways collective identities have defined the past.

Sarah Shields

Sarah Shields has been at UNC for decades, and both of her children have graduated wearing Tar Heel blue. She teaches courses on the modern Middle East, the conflict over Israel/Palestine, the history of Iraq, and a variety of courses on water in the Middle East. Her current research is on the Middle East and the establishment of borders after World War I. She has enjoyed teaching at UNC so much that she has even accompanied UNC students to programs in Turkey and England.

 

HIST 84-001: Monsters, Murders, and Mayhem in Microhistorical Analysis: French Case Studies

FY Seminar | TTH, 12:30 PM – 1:45 PM | Instructor(s): Jay M. Smith

French history has recently witnessed an extraordinary outpouring of microhistorical studies covering a range of phenomena from the Middle Ages to the twentieth century. This course explores both the distinctive features of microhistorical approaches to the past and the attractions of microhistory for the practicing historian. Does the efflorescence of microhistory among French specialists signal the maturity of socio-cultural history as a branch of the discipline, or does it instead signal the field’s sad retreat from grand interpretation and synthesis? Does the new appeal of the small-scale express historians’ capitulation to post-modern attacks on “truth” or new commitments to finding the truth? What are the strengths and limitations inherent to the genre? Students will read a sampling of recent work (much of it featuring murder and mayhem) and also try their hand at writing and otherwise formulating their own microhistorical narratives.

Jay M. Smith

Jay M. Smith is a specialist of early-modern European history whose research focuses on old regime and revolutionary France. Author or editor of five books, his most recent book in French history is Monsters of the Gévaudan: The Making of a Beast (2011).

 

HIST 89-001: History and the Meaning of Life

FY Seminar | MW, 2:30 PM – 3:45 PM | Instructor(s): Michael Morgan

For thousands of years, people have grappled with fundamental questions about the meaning of their lives: How do we find our place in the world? How should we live? What should we strive for? What legacy can we hope to leave behind? The answers are hard to find, but we can search for them by looking to the past. History gives us innumerable examples of how different people have grappled with these questions in different ways. This seminar will look at a few of these people, both famous and obscure, and five major themes: macro and micro; family and everyday life; transformation and adventure; conflict and survival; and inheritance and memory. Using biographies, memoirs, oral histories, and historical narratives, we will explore what history can teach us about life’s biggest questions.

Michael Morgan

Michael Morgan specializes in international and global history. He first book, The Final Act, examines the origins and consequences of the Helsinki Accords, the most ambitious diplomatic undertaking of the Cold War. At UNC, he teaches courses on the Cold War, modern and contemporary international history, and the history of human rights. Before coming to UNC, he taught at the US Naval War College and the University of Toronto, where he was the inaugural holder of the Raymond Pryke Chair.

 

HIST 89-002: Modern Afghanistan

FY Seminar | TTH, 2:30 PM – 3:45 PM | Instructor(s): Eren Tasar

This course focuses on the history of modern Afghanistan over the past two hundred years. Its main methodological feature is an interplay between a main textbook and fictional and journalistic materials as well as primary sources.

Eren Tasar

Eren Tasar is a historian of Soviet Central Asia. Professor Tasar’s first book, Soviet and Muslim: the Institutionalization of Islam in Central Asia, focused on the consequences of the communist attempt to bureaucratize Islam in the USSR’s largest Muslim region after World War II. Professor Tasar’s current research focuses on atheism in Soviet Central Asia. Much of Tasar’s teaching focuses on the postcolonial Islamic world.

 

HIST 89-003: Truth and Reconciliation in South Africa

FY Seminar | TTH, 9:30 AM – 10:45 AM | Instructor(s): Lauren Jarvis

How do countries overcome histories of racial injustice, inequality, and violence? What role can history play in promoting reconciliation? In 1994, South Africa embarked upon an experiment to answer these questions. The centerpiece of South African efforts was the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC). From 1995-2002, TRC appointees did research and interviewed thousands of South Africans to uncover a hidden history of apartheid-era violence in the hope that truth would bring about reconciliation. South Africans still debate whether the TRC met its aims, but the model of the TRC has been emulated around the world since. This course will examine the significance of the TRC in the longer history of transitional justice from the end of World War II to the present. Students will conduct historical research, whether about South Africa or another country, in order to propose their own plans for a truth commission.

Lauren Jarvis

Lauren Jarvis is a historian of 20th-century South Africa. Her current research focuses on how ideas move and, more specifically, how religious communities move them. In South Africa, these questions are especially interesting because of the ways that race and racism shaped Africans’ mobility and access to land and, as a result, the growth of Christianity in the country. Jarvis is also in the early stages of research for a book project on South Africans’ contributions to international humanitarianism and human rights history over the twentieth century. Jarvis completed her BA in History at an institution a few miles down the road (rhymes with “fluke”) and her MA and PhD in History at Stanford University. Before coming to UNC, she taught at Stanford, San Francisco State University, and the University of Utah. Jarvis has spent more than five years in South Africa working and doing research and hopes that students will leave this course convinced, as she is, that South Africa is actually the center of the universe. (Just kidding…sort of!)

 

JWST 56-001: Germans, Jews, and the History of Anti-Semitism

FY Seminar | TTH, 12:30 PM – 1:45 PM | Instructor(s): Adi Nester | Same as: GSLL 56-001

This seminar offers first-year students an introduction to the German-Jewish experience and the history of anti-semitism in Germany, from early modernity to the present day. Students in this seminar will learn to analyze a variety of texts (both literary and philosophical), musical works, and films in relation to the history of Jews in German-speaking countries, and will be able to apply their knowledge to their analysis of present-day manifestations of antisemitism and xenophobia in Germany. The course has no requisites and presumes no prior knowledge of the subject matter.

Adi Nester

Adi Nester received her Ph.D. in German Studies from the University of Colorado Boulder and holds additional degrees in Musicology and Piano Performance from the Hebrew University in Jerusalem and the University of Southern California. She joined the department of Germanic and Slavic Languages and Literatures at UNC in fall 2020. Adi’s research focuses on German-Jewish Studies and the intersection of literature, music, theology, and politics in the cultures and traditions of German-speaking countries.

 

LING 70-001: Language in the U.S.A.

FY Seminar | TTH, 3:30 PM – 4:45 PM | Instructor(s): Paul Roberge

The linguistic landscape of the United States in historical and contemporary perspective: American English dialects, language maintenance and shift among Native American and immigrant groups, language politics and policy.

Paul Roberge

Paul Roberge is professor of Germanic languages and joint professor of linguistics at UNC-CH. He also holds the title of professor extraordinary of general linguistics at Stellenbosch University (South Africa). He did his graduate work at the University of Michigan, where he concentrated in both Germanic and general linguistics. He received MA degrees in 1973 (Germanic languages) and 1975 (linguistics), and the PhD in 1980. He came to Chapel Hill in 1985 by way of Princeton University (1980-85; visiting associate professor, 1988). His research and teaching areas include older Germanic dialects (esp. Gothic, Old High German, Old Saxon, Old Norse); comparative Germanic grammar; Afrikaans; pidgins and creoles; sociolinguistics; origin and evolution of human language.

 

LING 89-001: How Reading Works: Language, Cognition, and Literacy

FY Seminar | MW, 3:35 PM – 4:50 PM | Instructor(s): Jennifer Smith

In many societies today, we live our lives surrounded by the written word. But did you ever stop to wonder how reading works? How do we go from looking at symbols on a page, sign, or screen to understanding the writer’s message? How do children learn to read, and what ways of teaching reading would best promote success for all students? We will explore these questions through hands-on analysis of language and writing-system structure, as well as discussion of the primary research literature. Your final course project will address a real-world question about reading, literacy, or reading education from the perspective of language and cognition.

Jennifer Smith

Jennifer Smith first encountered linguistics as a first-year college student looking for ways to combine a love of languages with an interest in science. Her research focuses on the cognitive representation of language sound systems: what kinds of consonants, vowels, and syllables do the languages of the world use, and why? How does the sound-structure system of a language interact with the structure of words or sentences? She has been invited to teach courses and give lectures around the US and abroad, and she was awarded the Chapman Family Fellowship for excellence in teaching at UNC Chapel Hill.

 

MASC 52-001: Living with Our Oceans and Atmosphere

FY Seminar | TTH, 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM | Instructor(s): John Bane

This seminar will introduce students to the nature of the Earth’s oceans and atmosphere, and describe the processes that lead to our weather patterns and global climate. Emphasis is placed on understanding how the oceans and atmosphere affect human population, how oceanic and atmospheric changes are linked to increasing human activity, and how these changes can affect you. Basic principles and modern theories of changing climate, severe weather events, oceanic hazards, and interactions between the oceans and the atmosphere will be studied. Examples of presently active research being conducted at UNC and at other institutions will be used to highlight how the above topics are investigated scientifically. Readings will be taken from introductory textbooks on meteorology, oceanography and environmental sciences; and modern articles in periodicals such as Scientific American, Nature, American Scientist, National Geographic, Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society, and Weatherwise. Various websites, including those within the UNC Department of Marine Sciences, will be used.

John Bane

Born in his mother’s home town of Kalamazoo, Michigan, John Bane lived in several locations throughout the U.S and abroad with his military family (his father was an Air Force pilot). He returned to earn his B.S. in Physics and Mathematics at Western Michigan University before going on to Florida State University for a Ph.D. in Physical Oceanography. Following a year at LSU where he studied coastal processes in the Gulf of Mexico, John joined the faculty at UNC. John conducts research on the dynamics of the Gulf Stream and coastal currents, ocean-atmosphere interaction processes, and marine renewable energy. This work focuses on mesoscale oceanic and atmospheric variability that occurs on daily and longer time scales. Past study regions include the Gulf Stream from the southeastern United States to the middle of the North Atlantic Ocean, the coastal ocean and atmosphere off the U. S. west coast, from southern California to Oregon, the northern Gulf of Mexico, and the shallow waters of the Bahama Banks. He has been involved in the promotion of marine alternative energy, from both wind and ocean current resources. Presently he is a member of two investigator groups funded through the National Science Foundation (Physical Oceanography Program) and the North Carolina Renewable Ocean Energy Program. These studies are ongoing in the Cape Hatteras region, offshore of the Carolinas and Virginia.

 

MASC 59-001: Extreme Microorganisms: Pushing the Limits of Life on Earth and Beyond

FY Seminar | TTH, 12:30 PM – 1:45 PM | Instructor(s): Andreas Teske

We will expand our horizons in biology by learning about some of the most extreme microorganisms on the planet – microorganisms that thrive without oxygen in deep marine sediments and in the Earth’s crust, under high temperatures in boiling hot springs or in superheated deep-sea water under high pressure, and under chemical stress factors (high sulfide and heavy metal concentrations) that were once thought to be incompatible with life. Numerous extremophilic (extreme-loving) microorganisms of different metabolic types have been isolated in the laboratory as pure cultures; others have been observed in Nature but have so far resisted cultivation. Extremophiles provide opportunities to study the unusual and strange biochemistry that allows them to thrive in their unique habitats; they are also valuable model systems for potential life on other planets. We will get to know the unusual habitats where extremophiles are found, for example hot springs and volcanic areas on land (Yellowstone) and in the ocean (hydrothermal vents), and we will explore the earliest history of extremophiles as some of the most ancient microorganisms on Earth.

Andreas Teske

Andreas Teske is a biochemist by training, but became fascinated by the microbial world of the oceans and focused his Ph.D. research on the ecology and diversity of marine bacteria that catalyze the sulfur cycle. After completing his Ph.D. at Bremen University and the Max-Planck-Institute for Marine Microbiology in Germany in 1995, he spent his postdoc years at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and stayed on as Assistant Scientist. Andreas Teske joined the UNC Marine Sciences faculty in 2002. His research interests include the microbiology of the deep marine subsurface, and microbial ecosystems of petroleum seeps and hydrothermal vents. In search of novel extreme marine microorganisms, he and his students are participating in a wide range of research cruises.

 

MATH 231H-01F: Calculus of Functions of One Variable I

FY Launch | TTH, 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM | Instructor(s): Xuqiang Qin | Lab/Recitation: MATH 231H-620

Prerequisites, score of at least 32 on the ACT Math Test or Score of at least 700 on the SAT MATH 2 Subject Test or score of at least 4 on the AP Calculus AB Test or on the AB Subscore for the AP Calculus BC Test or Grade of A- or higher in MATH 130 at UNC-CH (or have the equivalent transfer credit). Students may not receive credit for both MATH 231 and MATH 241.

Math 231 is designed to provide a detailed introduction to the fundamental ideas of calculus. It does not assume any prior calculus knowledge, but the student is expected to be proficient working with functions and their graphs as well as manipulating variable expressions and solving equations using algebra.

This is the Honors section of Math 231. It offers a more demanding and deeper treatment than the regular sections as well as more involved applications. There will be more emphasis on understanding theory than in other sections, and students will be expected to understand and reproduce proofs of theorems and formulas. In addition, this section will cover extra topics, including the epsilon-delta definition of limit. Applications will be more involved and will sometimes involve real data. Homework will be more challenging, with more emphasis on creative problem solving and less emphasis on drill. Students will be expected to complete a final project.

Xuqiang Qin

 

MATH 62H-001: Combinatorics

FY Seminar | TTH, 12:30 PM – 1:45 PM | Instructor(s): Ivan Cherednik

A leading expert in Modern Combinatorics wants to share his vision of the subject with the students. The seminar is a perfect background for future specialists in mathematics, physics, computer science, biology, economics, for those who are curious what statistical physics is about, what is cryptography, and how stock market works, and for everyone who likes mathematics.

The course will be organized around the following topics:

  • Puzzles: dimer covering, magic squares, 36 officers
  • Combinations: from coin tossing to dice and poker
  • Fibonacci numbers: rabbits, population growth, etc.
  • Arithmetic: designs, cyphers, intro to finite fields
  • Catalan numbers: from playing roulette to stock market

The students will learn about the history of Combinatorics, its connections with the theory of numbers, its fundamental role in the natural sciences and various applications.

It is an advanced research course; all students are expected to participate in projects under the supervision of I.Ch. and the Graduate Research Consultant (the GRC Program). This seminar is partially supported by Honors Carolina.

The grades will be based on the exam, bi-weekly home assignments and the participation in the projects. The course requires focus and effort, but, generally, the students are quite satisfied with the progress they make (and their grades too).

From the Course Evaluation: “A difficult but wholly worthwhile course: I feel more competent for having taken it”, “I would recommend this FYS to others ONLY if they have a VERY strong affinity for and ability in Algebra (I thought I did, but I was wrong)”.

Ivan Cherednik

Professor Ivan Cherednik is Austin H. Carr Distinguished Professor of Mathematics. Trained at the Steklov Mathematics Institute of the Soviet Academy of Sciences and at Moscow State University, his areas of specialization are Representation Theory, Combinatorics, Number Theory, Harmonic Analysis, and Mathematical Physics. Cherednik’s particular affection for Combinatorics is well known: he proved the celebrated Constant term conjecture in Combinatorics.

 

MUSC 120-01F: Foundations in Music

FY Launch | MW, 10:10 AM – 11:25 AM | Instructor(s): Andrea F. Bohlman

If you are planning on majoring or minoring in music: this course is designed to open up the pathways in music at Carolina for you. It’s an introduction to the different approaches to thinking about and doing music–whether you’re an active performer, an electronic music fiend, a budding music researcher, an entrepreneurial arts administrator in the making…or more! Our classroom meetings expose students to a range of ways to “think about music,” emphasizing the breadth of routes music and sound take through human lives. As a foundational component of the music major and minor, the course emphasizes a range of genres of music making and fosters curious listening. Sometimes we’ll be challenged to think differently about very familiar sounds, sometimes challenged to connect to music very different from that we feel as ours. Expect to leave the semester with a new sense of what music can be for you at Carolina.

Andrea F. Bohlman

Andrea F. Bohlman (Associate Professor) studies music, sound, and politics. She has written about the history—and present—of music, protest movements, and political organizing. In these books and articles, she writes about symphonies, spoken poetry, electronic dance music, love ballads, and devotional music..along with chants, surveillance recordings, and more. Most of her research is on the social experience of sound and music in Eastern Europe, but she has also written about the United States and Germany in times of war. In her current research, she is writing about how sound recording fosters intimate social relationships, and how these relationships show listening to be a powerful way to navigate trust and recognized difference, especially in the context of gender, race, and ability.

 

MUSC 51-001: The Interplay of Music and Physics

FY Seminar | TTH, 2:00 PM – 3:15 PM | Instructor(s): Laurie McNeil, Brent Wissick | Same as: PHYS 51-001

This seminar is for students who are interested in how music is made, how sound is produced in instruments, and how those sounds have been used in music making from ancient times to the present day. Students will study the basics of physics and music: wave motion, resonance, the perception of sound, scales, harmony, and music theory. Students who have never studied physics or music theory are welcome to enroll; there are no prerequisites. We will conduct four laboratory exercises (called etudes) in which students will work in small groups to investigate the acoustics of string, woodwind and brass instruments. Keyboards and percussion will also be considered, and students can pursue their areas of special interest in a research paper. The final project for each student will be a public performance of an original musical composition for an ensemble of instruments that the students have constructed themselves out of found objects. This class is taught in person and does not accommodate remote learners. This class meets in various locations according to a schedule listed on the class Sakai site.

Laurie McNeil

Laurie McNeil spent her childhood in Ann Arbor, Michigan before studying Chemistry and Physics at Radcliffe College (Harvard University) and Physics at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, where she received her Ph.D. in 1982. After spending two years conducting research at MIT, she moved to Chapel Hill, where she has taught elementary physics, optics, solid-state physics, and materials science. Her seminar grows out of her life as a choral singer (and, earlier, a violinist and recorder player). When not singing with the Choral Society of Durham, she can be found in her laboratory using lasers to study the properties of materials.

Brent Wissick

Brent Wissick has taught cello, chamber music and early music at UNC-CH since 1982; and performs across the US and abroad. But he has had a life-long interest in how instruments work and how sound is made. He loves encouraging musicians to understand some of these issues, and getting a broad range of science students involved in doing “musical” things. He thinks about physics when practicing the cello or viola da gamba, making CD recordings, rehearsing with ensembles, giving lessons and listening to music in a variety of spaces. He still wakes up every morning excited to make and study music with professional colleagues and undergraduates.

 

MUSC 89-001: Sound Art

FY Seminar | TTH, 2:00 PM – 3:15 PM | Instructor(s): Lee Weisert

This course explores the primary concepts, techniques, and artists/works falling under the category of “sound art,” an interdisciplinary field that centers sound and listening in contexts outside of traditional musical performance. Examples of sound art include sound installations, soundwalks, performance art, conceptual music, music technology, and more. Artistic work at the intersections of visual art, sculpture, science, architecture, theater, poetry, and music will be discussed in a seminar-style class format. In addition to learning about the history and aesthetics of sound art, students will participate in the creation and performance of original sound art works.

Lee Weisert

Lee Weisert is a composer of instrumental and electronic music and a multimedia sound artist. He teaches courses in music technology, composition, musicianship, and digital media at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Weisert’s recent music has incorporated increasingly disparate elements such as orchestral instruments, found sounds, field recordings, digital synthesis, and analog circuitry, in an attempt to find, “through experimentation, tinkering, and unconventional approaches, a ritualistic and deeply expressive world of sound.” His music is published by New Focus Recordings.

 

MUSC 89-002: Genre and the Music Industry

FY Seminar | TTH, 12:30 PM – 1:45 PM | Instructor(s): Aaron Harcus

What is a musical genre and why does it matter? Much more than a label, genres have the power to bring individuals together into communities of artists, critics, and fans, while at the same time putting artists and fans in a box defined by stereotypes. In this way, music genres both reflect and shape broader issues in society centered around race, gender, and class. Thus, a study of genre helps us understand why country music came to be connected primarily with white people, why some genres (R&B, soul, hip hop) are considered “Black music,” why some genres are associated with teenaged girls and others considered low class. This course seeks to answer these questions from an historical perspective. You will examine how genres have organized the production, consumption, and interpretation of popular music since the late-nineteenth century and the profound influence genres have today in shaping our aesthetics, values, and identities.

Aaron Harcus

Aaron Harcus received his Ph.D in Music Theory from CUNY Graduate Center (2017). Before joining the faculty at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, he taught at Hunter College, CUNY, and the University of Massachusetts at Amherst. His research interests include questions of musical genre and the racialization of popular music in the United States, musical hermeneutics and phenomenology, the aesthetics and history of rap music. He has presented his research at national conferences of the Society for Music Theory, MTSMA, the Society for American Music, and the Puerto Rico Conservatory of Music.

 

PHIL 85-001: Reason, Religion, and Reality in the Copernican Revolution

FY Seminar | TTH, 2:00 PM – 3:15 PM | Instructor(s): Marc Lange

The reasoning by which Galileo and his contemporaries defended the Copernican model of the solar system (the “heliocentric” model – that is, with the Earth orbiting the Sun rather than the Sun orbiting the Earth) can puzzle us even today. Here are a few of the questions that we could ask about the reasoning given by Copernicus, Galileo, and their contemporaries. Did Copernicus’s arguments support the heliocentric model strongly enough to justify believing it true? Or was it unjustified until Galileo amassed telescopic evidence for it? Or was it unjustified until even later – when Newtonian physics was developed? Or did it remain unjustified until even later – when various mechanical and optical discoveries were made in the nineteenth century? Was the Catholic Church justified at the time of Galileo in regarding Copernicus’s theory as just one among many fairly successful techniques for predicting the night sky’s appearance? Did Galileo bring his sentence (at his famous – and notorious – trial) on himself? Could Galileo argue persuasively for his telescope’s reliability? Could Galileo use mere “thought-experiments” (as opposed to actual experiments) to defend Copernicanism? In this course, we will grapple with these and related questions in order to arrive at a more nuanced understanding of the logic by which scientific theories in general are tested and, ultimately, justified. We will also try to use this historical episode to understand better how political, social, and cultural factors can influence the reception of a scientific theory – even today! We will learn some of the means by which the biases and presuppositions introduced by these factors were overcome (eventually) in the Copernican Revolution, and we will apply some of these lessons to current science. At various points during our discussions, each student will submit in written form his or her own best reconstructions of some of the arguments that were given for or against the Copernican model. In other words, each student will offer his or her best advice regarding how a given scientist might have argued for or against Copernicanism, anticipating possible objections and responses. Students will occasionally form groups to examine and to critique one another’s proposals, with each group finally presenting its best thoughts orally to the rest of the class for further discussion. Students will, in effect, be putting Galileo on trial once again – not for heresy or for disobeying authority, but for having convincing or for having insufficient evidence for his Copernicanism. In all of these ways, students will learn how to appreciate sympathetically the competing astronomical theories from the perspective of the 16th and 17th centuries, when the truth was in some doubt. Along the way, students will wrestle with some of the puzzles and apparent paradoxes arising even from today’s best philosophical accounts of the logic of theory testing in science. No previous background in science will be assumed. Students will not need to purchase any books.

Marc Lange

Marc Lange is Theda Perdue Distinguished Professor of Philosophy. He specializes in the philosophy of science and related areas of metaphysics, epistemology, and the philosophy of mathematics, along with the philosophy of physics and the philosophy of biology. He won UNC’s 2016 Distinguished Teaching Award for Post-Baccalaureate Instruction and a Bowman and Gordon Gray Distinguished Term Professorship for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching. (For a brief sample of his teaching, see https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_SKmqh5Eu4Y)

 

PHIL 89-001: Personal Identity

FY Seminar | TTH, 12:30 PM – 1:45 PM | Instructor(s): Jim Pryor

You are different now from how you were ten years ago; but still you are one and the same person, who underwent those changes. (You weren’t replaced by an imposter.) What makes you the particular person you are, and the same person as the youth you used to be? What kind of thing is a person, that it can maintain its identity even through such changes? Are we identical to our life stories? Is the idea of a persisting self just an illusion? What would it take for a person to stop existing? Do you have an immortal soul that could survive the death of your human body? Or are you identical to your body? Might it be possible to survive the death of your body by having your brain, or the information in your brain, transplanted into a new body? or into a computer network? Might amnesia or dementia amount to one person’s ceasing and being replaced by another? Would teleportation like they use in Star Trek be a fast means for you to travel — or would that be another way for you to cease to exist and be replaced by a perfect copy? Why do we take special interest in our own continued existence as persons, moreso than the continued existence of people similar to us, or who will push forward our projects? Should we?

Jim Pryor

Jim Pryor joined the philosophy department in 2020. Before that, he spent time at NYU, Harvard, and Princeton. His research and teaching spans epistemology, philosophy of language, and philosophy of mind. Issues he has focused on include: perception, evidence, belief, and confidence; our knowledge of our own minds; persons, memory, and the nature of the self; mistaken identity; and issues at the intersection of philosophy, linguistics, and computer science.

 

PHIL 89-002: Fun and Games, and Philosophy: An Inquiry into the Nature and Value of Games

FY Seminar | MWF, 11:15 AM – 12:05 PM | Instructor(s): John T. Roberts

A game is (perhaps by definition) an activity that lacks a serious point. Yet, we humans spend a lot of time and energy playing games, and we sometimes take them very seriously. How is this possible? Are games mere entertainment, or do they have some kind of deeper value?

We will use the tools of contemporary philosophy to examine questions about games, including: What makes a game a game? Is game-design an art form? To what extent are other (more ‘serious’) areas of life similar to games? Can this similarity be used to clarify those other areas of life? What ethical obligations we have when it comes to playing games, or designing them? Is the ‘gamification’ of real life possible? Would it be a good idea?

Students will collaborate in writing a philosophy research paper, and each student will do a final project in which they design a new game.

John T. Roberts

John T. Roberts majored in Physics at Georgia Tech before switching fields to Philosophy. He got his PhD in Philosophy from the University of Pittsburgh in 1999, and he has been teaching at Carolina ever since. He loves to dance, cook, play music, read science fiction, and play strategy games. His research focuses on the nature of scientific understanding, and in his work he sometimes uses games as a conceptual tool for clarifying the structure of language and thought.

 

PHYS 118-01F: Introductory Calculus-based Mechanics and Relativity

FY Launch | MWF, 8:00 AM – 8:50 AM | Instructor(s): Yue Wu, Jianping Lu | Lab/Recitation: PHYS 118-401 FY-Launch (35 seats); Stefan Jeglinski

Requisites: Prerequisite, MATH 231; Pre- or corequisite, MATH 232; permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisites.

Mechanics of particles and rigid bodies. Newton’s laws; mechanical and potential energy; mechanical conservation laws; frame-dependence of physical laws; Einstein’s Theory of Relativity. Students may not receive credit for PHYS 118 in addition to PHYS 104, 114, or 116.

Yue Wu, Jianping Lu

In a previous 30-year career, Stefan Jeglinski designed and built instrumentation, learned to program from scratch, and performed R&D for large and small companies. For five years he was an actual rocket scientist, so when he says “this ain’t rocket science,” he knows what he’s talking about! He broke away from rockets to complete his PhD in experimental solid state physics at the University of Utah, and then returned to industry where he spent over 15 years in all aspects of product development for electron microscopy, before landing at UNC in 2010 to share everything he’s learned. In addition to his love of teaching physics, he brings a lifetime of real-world experience and stories about building, making, and engineering across disciplines.

 

PHYS 118-02F: Introductory Calculus-based Mechanics and Relativity

FY Launch | MWF, 9:05 AM – 9:55 AM | Instructor(s): Yue Wu, Jianping Lu | Lab/Recitation: PHYS 118-402 FY-Launch (35 seats); Daniel Young

Requisites: Prerequisite, MATH 231; Pre- or corequisite, MATH 232; permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisites.

Mechanics of particles and rigid bodies. Newton’s laws; mechanical and potential energy; mechanical conservation laws; frame-dependence of physical laws; Einstein’s Theory of Relativity. Students may not receive credit for PHYS 118 in addition to PHYS 104, 114, or 116.

Yue Wu, Jianping Lu

In a previous 30-year career, Stefan Jeglinski designed and built instrumentation, learned to program from scratch, and performed R&D for large and small companies. For five years he was an actual rocket scientist, so when he says “this ain’t rocket science,” he knows what he’s talking about! He broke away from rockets to complete his PhD in experimental solid state physics at the University of Utah, and then returned to industry where he spent over 15 years in all aspects of product development for electron microscopy, before landing at UNC in 2010 to share everything he’s learned. In addition to his love of teaching physics, he brings a lifetime of real-world experience and stories about building, making, and engineering across disciplines.

 

PHYS 51-001: The Interplay of Music and Physics

FY Seminar | TTH, 2:00 PM – 3:15 PM | Instructor(s): Laurie McNeil, Brent Wissick | Same as: MUSC 51-001

This seminar is for students who are interested in how music is made, how sound is produced in instruments, and how those sounds have been used in music making from ancient times to the present day. Students will study the basics of physics and music: wave motion, resonance, the perception of sound, scales, harmony, and music theory. Students who have never studied physics or music theory are welcome to enroll; there are no prerequisites. We will conduct four laboratory exercises (called etudes) in which students will work in small groups to investigate the acoustics of string, woodwind and brass instruments. Keyboards and percussion will also be considered, and students can pursue their areas of special interest in a research paper. The final project for each student will be a public performance of an original musical composition for an ensemble of instruments that the students have constructed themselves out of found objects. This class is taught in person and does not accommodate remote learners. This class meets in various locations according to a schedule listed on the class Sakai site.

Laurie McNeil

Laurie McNeil spent her childhood in Ann Arbor, Michigan before studying Chemistry and Physics at Radcliffe College (Harvard University) and Physics at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, where she received her Ph.D. in 1982. After spending two years conducting research at MIT, she moved to Chapel Hill, where she has taught elementary physics, optics, solid-state physics, and materials science. Her seminar grows out of her life as a choral singer (and, earlier, a violinist and recorder player). When not singing with the Choral Society of Durham, she can be found in her laboratory using lasers to study the properties of materials.

Brent Wissick

Brent Wissick has taught cello, chamber music and early music at UNC-CH since 1982; and performs across the US and abroad. But he has had a life-long interest in how instruments work and how sound is made. He loves encouraging musicians to understand some of these issues, and getting a broad range of science students involved in doing “musical” things. He thinks about physics when practicing the cello or viola da gamba, making CD recordings, rehearsing with ensembles, giving lessons and listening to music in a variety of spaces. He still wakes up every morning excited to make and study music with professional colleagues and undergraduates.

 

PHYS 55-001: Introduction to Mechatronics

FY Seminar | MW, 10:10 AM – 11:25 AM | Instructor(s): Stefan Jeglinski | Lab/Recitation: PHYS 55-401 and PHYS 55-402

Mechatronics is a multidisciplinary synergy of STEM fields, specifically physics, engineering, electronics, and computer science. All students, regardless of their educational goals, will achieve critical introductory skills in numerical reasoning and analysis, model-building and prototyping, computer programming and electronics, and will demonstrate proficiency and knowledge about topics that increasingly impact society. The course focuses on four areas: Numeracy and Proportional Reasoning, Rapid Prototyping and Manufacturing, Computer Technology (Programming and Electronics), and Current and Future technologies (aka, shall we welcome our new mechatronic overlords – robotics, AI, and quantum computing). The course goals are to prepare students for academic success at UNC, to help science students be more capable scientists, and to help ALL students be stronger and better-informed citizens of the world.

Stefan Jeglinski

In a previous 30-year career, Stefan Jeglinski designed and built instrumentation, learned to program from scratch, and performed R&D for large and small companies. For five years he was an actual rocket scientist, so when he says “this ain’t rocket science,” he knows what he’s talking about! He broke away from rockets to complete his PhD in experimental solid state physics at the University of Utah, and then returned to industry where he spent over 15 years in all aspects of product development for electron microscopy, before landing at UNC in 2010 to share everything he’s learned. In addition to his love of teaching physics, he brings a lifetime of real-world experience and stories about building, making, and engineering across disciplines.

 

PLCY 55-001: Higher Education, the College Experience, and Public Policy

FY Seminar | MW, 3:35 PM – 4:50 PM | Instructor(s): Anna Krome-Lukens

Higher education is undergoing rapid transformations that may dramatically change the undergraduate college experience. In this course, you will examine urgent questions facing American colleges and universities. For example, why is the cost of college rising and what implications does this shift have for who attends and graduates from college? How well is higher education preparing students for jobs of the future? How has new technology reshaped the college experience, both academically and socially? How should universities respond to student needs and desires? What role should athletics play in higher education? We’ll explore these and other topics through class discussion, position papers, oral presentations and debates, and interactions with UNC faculty and staff. By introducing you to the history, institutions, and culture of higher education, this course also will help you transition into and make the most of your college experience.

Anna Krome-Lukens

Anna Krome-Lukens is a Teaching Assisant Professor and Director of Experiential Education in Public Policy. She completed her PhD in U.S. History at UNC-Chapel Hill, with research focused on the history of social welfare and public health policies. She developed her interest in pressing issues in higher education while she was in graduate school, through involvement in UNC’s graduate branch of student government, work in Undergraduate Retention, and service on several university-wide committees. As a member of the faculty, she continues to be involved in (and fascinated by) policy-making within the university.

 

PLCY 75-001: Debates in Public Policy and Racial Inequality

FY Seminar | TTH, 12:30 PM – 1:45 PM | Instructor(s): Cassandra Davis

This course is designed to introduce students to debates about the impact of policies on inequalities in the United States. We will begin the class by reviewing work on inequalities more broadly. At the beginning of the semester, we will touch on topics like Black Lives Matter, historical oppression, systemic racism, and Whiteness. From there, we will move to investigate the use of education policy as a tool to maintain inequalities within the United States. We will tackle areas such as Indian boarding schools, the desegregation of schools, academic tracking, criminalization of Black and Brown students, and achievement testing.

In this class, students will review relevant research, policies, court cases, and projects that aim to either maintain or eliminate inequality. Students will also be expected to engage in thought-provoking conversations around disparities and will be encouraged to think critically about challenging topics. Additionally, students will work individually and in small groups on a series of assignments over the semester. Prerequisites are not required for this introductory course.

Cassandra Davis

Dr. Cassandra Davis is a Research Assistant Professor of Public Policy at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Within the last four years, Dr. Davis has held the role of principal investigator on five research evaluations, with the most recent of these projects focused on the impacts of hurricanes on schools, educators, and students in low-income communities. Dr. Davis has also collaborated with school districts to assist them with improving graduation rates of underrepresented groups, supporting students with learning differences, identifying opportunity and achievement gaps amongst students, assessing the quality of professional development training for school personnel, and investigating ways to engage parents. Dr. Davis’ areas of interest include education policy, the impact of natural disaster on schools and communities, program evaluation, qualitative research methods, and the social and historical context in education. Dr. Davis holds a Ph.D. in Education from UNC Chapel Hill.

 

PLCY 85-001: Reforming America's Schools

FY Seminar | TTH, 3:30 PM – 4:45 PM | Instructor(s): Douglas Lauen

This seminar will examine the role of schools and other institutions play in determining life chances, which educational interventions work well for economically and academically disadvantaged students, and what to do when institutions cease to work well. Students will learn how to analyze complex educational public policy problems while exploring questions of effectiveness, inequality, resource management, and politics.

Douglas Lauen

Dr. Douglas Lauen’s work seeks to understand the effects of educational policies, school types, and school contextual factors on student outcomes. He focuses on areas that policymakers can control and that have high relevance to current educational policy debates, such as classroom poverty composition, educational accountability, performance incentives, and school choice.

 

PLCY 89-001: Education in a Multicultural Society

FY Seminar | TTH, 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM | Instructor(s): Simona Goldin

This seminar focuses on education in the multicultural society of the United States, and aims to help students develop new understandings of the role of schools and teaching. We will also work to construct alternative perspectives on and approaches to examining educational issues. Featuring opportunities for engaged learning, we will learn in the environment surrounding UNC, working to understand how local histories, cultures, and experiences have affected the opportunities that young people have– and have not– experienced in public schools. Moving into the policy space, we will evaluate and design for equity and justice in public schooling. We will also include work on portraiture, on seeing and learning about the experiences of race and racism in public schools, and the ways in which communities have advocated for experiences in ways that are strength- and asset-filled.

Simona Goldin

Simona Goldin is a Research Associate Professor of Public Policy. She had a Ph.D. in Educational Studies and a master’s degree in management and urban policy analysis. Her research and scholarship consider efforts to transform the preparation of beginning teachers to teach in more racially just and equitable ways. Her most recent work has looked carefully at the ways that innovations are weaponized against the very communities they are meant to support. Goldin serves as co-chair of the Equity in Schools Project Team on the UNC Commission on History, Race, and a Way Forward.

 

POLI 100-01F: American Democracy in Changing Times

FY Launch | TTH, 12:30 PM – 1:45 PM | Instructor(s): Marc J. Hetherington

Why do Americans love democracy, but hate politics? Why are there only two political parties? Why do voters hate, yet respond to negative campaigning? This course will introduce students to politics in the United States, addressing these and many more questions about how American democracy works.

Marc J. Hetherington

Marc J. Hetherington is Raymond Dawson Distinguished Bicentennial Professor in the Department of Political Science. A scholar of public opinion, he specializes in the study of political trust and party polarization. Over the past year, Marc has devoted his research to the impact of politics and science colliding in the context of Covid-19. He’s authored a range of academic books and published articles in his discipline’s major journals. As for teaching, Marc regularly offers courses on American Government, Political Parties, Public Opinion, and Polarization.

 

POLI 59-001: Revolution, America in 1776 and France in 1789

FY Seminar | TTH, 9:30 AM – 10:45 AM | Instructor(s): Matthew Weidenfeld

This course is designed to throw students into New York City in 1775 and Paris in 1791 by recreating and engaging with the ideas and arguments of these times. The course will rely on the Reacting to the Past pedagogy. “Reacting to the Past” (RTTP) consists of elaborate games, set in the past, in which students are assigned roles informed by classic texts in the history of ideas. Class sessions are run entirely by students; instructors advise and guide students and grade their oral and written work. It seeks to draw students into the past, promote engagement with big ideas, and improve intellectual and academic skills. The course will be extremely hard work, but should also be intellectually engaging and, to put it simply, a good deal of fun. Click here to see a video of students discussing their experiences in the class.

Matthew Weidenfeld

Dr. Matthew Weidenfeld has a wide range of teaching interests and experience in the history of political theory and in American Politics. Recently, his courses have featured role-immersive, Reacting to the Past Simulations. These consist of elaborate games, set in the past, in which students are assigned roles informed by classic texts in the history of ideas. Class sessions are run entirely by students; though he advises and guides students throughout. The simulations seek to draw students into the past, promote engagement with big ideas, and improve intellectual and academic skills.

 

POLI 63-001: Social Movements and Political Protest and Violence

FY Seminar | TTH, 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM | Instructor(s): Pamela Conover

This seminar focuses on explaining and understanding social movements and the collective political behaviors that they promote (e.g. demonstrations, protests, violence, and eco-terrorism). Our theoretical focus will be interdisciplinary, drawing on research in political behavior, social psychology, sociology, political theory, and the law. We will discuss when and why collective action occurs, who participates, what forms it takes, and how governments respond. Substantively, we will study a variety of movements including: Black Lives Matter, #MeToo movement, the Environmental movement, the White Nationalist movement, COVID protests, and the January 6th Capitol protest. We will use a variety of approaches and resources: class discussions, films, online forum discussions, and texts. Grades will be based on class participation, forum participation, a writing project, and several group papers.

This class will be taught remotely with both asychronous and sychronous components.

Pamela Conover

Pamela Conover, Burton Craige Professor of Political Science, was educated at Emory University and received her Ph.D. at the University of Minnesota. Professor Conover teaches courses dealing with political psychology, women and politics, and social movements and political protest. In the past, Professor Conover’s research has concerned the nature of political thinking and the politics of identity and citizenship. She also coauthored the book Feminism and the New Right. Her current research is focused on election aversion, religious freedom, and the effect of worldviews on political behavior. In her spare time, she enjoys cycling, yoga and being walked by her two golden retrievers, Sophie and Henry.

 

POLI 66-001: The United States and the European Union: Partners or Rivals?

FY Seminar | TTH, 2:00 PM – 3:15 PM | Instructor(s): Liesbet Hooghe

The alliance between America and the European Union is one of the most important political relationships today.

Liesbet Hooghe

Liesbet Hooghe is the W.R. Kenan Professor of Political Science at UNC-Chapel Hill and Robert Schuman Fellow at the European University Institute, Florence. Her research interests are in political behavior (elites, political parties, public opinion), multilevel governance and decentralization, European integration, international organization. In 2017 she received the Daniel Elazar Distinguished Scholar Award for Federalism and Intergovernmental Relations of the APSA. Hooghe’s recent co-authored books include The European Commission in the 21st Century (OUP, 2013); Measuring Regional Authority (OUP, 2016); Community, Scale and Regional Governance (OUP, 2016); and Measuring International Authority (OUP, 2017). Homepage: http://hooghe.web.unc.edu.

 

POLI 89-001: Immigrants and Refugees in World Politics

FY Seminar | TTH, 9:30 AM – 10:45 AM | Instructor(s): Niklaus Steiner

The movement of people across international borders is one of the most politically controversial issues in the world today. This class focuses on two different types of global migrants, immigrants and refugees, and explores why these two groups move out of their countries and how they are treated by receiving countries. Immigrants and refugees have traditionally been thought of as politically, legally and ethically different from each other and this class explores these differences, but it also explores the many ways that they are similar. Finally, the class explores a third type of global migrant that politicians and policy makers frequently promote, guest workers, and considers to what extent guest worker policies can effectively address the challenges and opportunities posed by the two other migrant groups. This class encourages students from a wide range of backgrounds, experiences and perspectives to enroll because it benefits significantly from including such diversity.

Niklaus Steiner

Niklaus Steiner is a native of Thun, Switzerland, who moved to Chapel Hill with his family when his father became a professor at Carolina. He earned a bachelor’s degree with highest honors in international studies at UNC and a Ph.D. in political science at Northwestern University. He has had the good fortune of moving between cultures his whole life and because of this experience, his teaching and research interests are around immigration, refugees, human rights, nationalism, and citizenship. His textbook, International Migration and Citizenship Today seeks to facilitate classroom discussions on admission and membership in liberal democracies, and he is currently working on a 2nd edition. Before joining the political science department in 2020, he enjoyed working at UNC’s Center for Global Initiatives, the last 15 as the director, and he is especially proud of the work he and many colleagues from across campus did to bring diversity, equity and inclusion into global education at Carolina. When not at work, Niklaus is often cutting or replanting flowers in the garden, walking in the woods with his family or making something up in the kitchen.

 

POLI 89-002: Global Politics of Climate Change

FY Seminar | TTH, 3:30 PM – 4:45 PM | Instructor(s): Robert Jenkins

This course is designed to provide an introduction to the politics of climate change at multiple levels of policy making, from global efforts down to local communities. Throughout the course, climate policy is investigated as a result of the interplay of science and politics. At each level of politics – global, regional (EU), country (US), sub-national (US states), and local (regional and city) – students will have the opportunity to review existing policy approaches, explore official inter-governmental and governmental policies, and read social science analyses. In addition, at each level, a scientific expert and/or activist will visit class to interact on climate issues. Student participation is required, with the format for class meetings combining a mixture of lectures and discussions as well as expert and activist speakers, video resources, and group presentations.

Robert Jenkins

Dr. Robert Jenkins has a combined thirty years of teaching experience at UNC and Yale University. He regularly teaches courses on international organizations, Transatlantic security, ethnic conflict and international intervention in former Yugoslavia, crises and change in Russia and Eastern Europe, and the comparative political mobilization of race and ethnicity. He has led study abroad programs in the Balkans and Vienna, Brussels and London, and Cape Town, South Africa. Common themes of these experiential programs are the activities of international organizations and conflicts over race and ethnic identity. In the past three years, he has systematically incorporated climate change into his teaching on security and international organizations. Based on this understanding of the growing threat of climate change and the range of global efforts to develop climate policies, he will bring his enthusiasm and passion for teaching and learning to this new course.

 

PSYC 101-01F: General Psychology

FY Launch | MWF, 10:10 AM – 11:00 AM | Instructor(s): Charlie Wiss

PSYC 101 is a prerequisite for all psychology courses. A survey of major principles of psychology and an introduction to scientific modes of thought about behavior. Students participate in ongoing psychological research in the department.

Charlie Wiss

 

PSYC 58-001: The Psychology of Mental States and Language Use

FY Seminar | TTH, 5:00 PM – 6:15 PM | Instructor(s): Charles Davis

Like breathing, the human capacity for language is something we take for granted. How is it that we so effortlessly listen, understand, and make sense of the sounds and squiggles we are bombarded with from the moment we’re born? Language offers a window of insight into other people’s minds, allowing us to understand their thoughts, intentions, beliefs, desires, and knowledge. By the time we’re adults, humans carry information about tens of thousands of words, about what those words mean, how they’re spelled, how they sound, and how to join them up into sentences, paragraphs, and conversations. In short, human language allows us to put thoughts into other people’s heads, and to access the thoughts that are in other people’s heads. Topics explored in this course include how language develops in infants and children, how adults use language to understand the world, how the human brain supports language, and what happens to language when brain function is divergent.

Charles Davis

Charles Davis is a Canadian cognitive neuroscientist researching and teaching about how the human mind extracts meaning from a messy world, with a specific focus on how we understand meaning in language (for example, what happens in the mind that allows us to understand what a melon is, or what justice is?). When not in the lab or classroom, he is probably hanging with his dog, watching basketball (his favorite player was UNC alum Vince Carter), in the kitchen, or exploring the outdoors.

 

PWAD 89-015: September 11: Origins, Consequences, and Where Do We Go From Here

FY Seminar | TTH, 12:30 PM – 1:45 PM | Instructor(s): Whitaker,Erinn Catherine

This first-year seminar will reflect upon the September 11 terrorist attacks in the United States, exploring how the terrorist attacks occurred and why the U.S. intelligence community and policymakers failed to anticipate and prevent them as well as the subsequent effects on the United States, the Middle East, and the world. The instructor, a former intelligence analyst, will lead students in discussions and in-class exercises to encourage critical analysis of the implications of terrorism, particularly on United States national security. A variety of assignments will require students to assess the causes and results of American national security decisions and alternative decisions that might have been made, supported with research and evidence.

Whitaker,Erinn Catherine

Erinn Whitaker, a former senior analyst for the Central Intelligence Agency and US State Department, is a Professor of the Practice for the Peace, War and Defense Curriculum at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. With nearly 15 years of experience overseas and in Washington, teaches courses such as “Writing and Briefing for Intelligence,” “Comparative Intelligence Regimes,” and “Cases in Counter Intelligence,” helping students interested in careers ranging from intelligence to public policy to journalism strengthen their written and oral communication skills. Whitaker earned a BA from Middlebury College, where she spent a year studying Russia in Siberia, and a MA from Georgetown University’s Walsh School of Foreign Service. She speaks German and Russian.

 

RELI 63-001: The Archaeology of Qumran and the Dead Sea Scrolls

FY Seminar | MW, 5:00 PM – 6:15 PM | Instructor(s): Jodi Magness

The Dead Sea Scrolls have been described as the most important archaeological discovery of the 20th century. The first scrolls were discovered in 1947, in a cave near the site of Qumran by the Dead Sea. Eventually the remains of over 900 scrolls were found in 11 caves around Qumran. The scrolls date to the time of Jesus and include the earliest preserved copies of the Hebrew Bible (Old Testament). They were deposited in the caves by members of a Jewish sect called the Essenes who lived at Qumran. In this seminar, students explore the meaning and significance of the Dead Sea Scrolls – and learn about broader issues such as how canons of sacred scripture developed among Jews and Christians – through classroom discussions, thought papers, and creative assignments.

Jodi Magness

Jodi Magness is the Kenan Distinguished Professor for Teaching Excellence in Early Judaism. Before coming to UNC–Chapel Hill in 2002, she taught at Tufts University for ten years. Professor Magness received her B.A. in Archaeology from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and her Ph.D. in Classical Archaeology from the University of Pennsylvania. She has participated on numerous excavations in Israel and Greece, and currently directs excavations at Huqoq in Israel. Professor Magness’ publications include a book entitled The Archaeology of Qumran and the Dead Sea Scrolls (2002).

 

RELI 64-001: Reintroducing Islam

FY Seminar | TTH, 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM | Instructor(s): Youssef Carter

Students learn about Islam as a global, historical religious tradition and the dynamic interaction between religious ideas, practices, and debates on one hand and a variety of geographical and historical contexts on the other. The course takes as its starting point the assumption that every first year student has already been exposed to ideas about Islam and Muslims, usually in the form of religious, cultural and racialized othering, which means that the course has to respond to such preconceived notions that have shaped their worldviews. Students are challenged to consider both similar and dramatically different ways of learning, knowing, and perceiving the world by Muslims in past and present, thereby exposing them to alternative ways of knowing and nurturing at the very least an appreciation of the value of difference and understanding of a perceived other.

Youssef Carter

Youssef Carter is an Assistant Professor of Religious Studies and Kenan Rifai Fellow in Islamic Studies. His research focuses on religious empowerment Afro-descendant Muslims. His current book project illuminates how Sufi epistemologies that emerge out of Senegal shape Black religious identities in the broader Atlantic, particularly in the American South and in West Africa.

 

RELI 65-001: Myth, Philosophy, and Science in the Ancient World

FY Seminar | TTH, 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM | Instructor(s): Zlatko Pleše

This interdisciplinary course explores various, often conflicting ways of conceiving and shaping reality in the ancient world – religious, scientific, and philosophical. The course is organized around a series of case studies: (1) the formation and makeup of the cosmos; (2) the origin of mankind and its sexual differentiation; (3) the invention of the ‘self’; (4) the origin and nature of dreams; (5) foundations of law, justice, and morality. Short writing assignments, in-class discussions, oral presentations, and a term-paper will be used to introduce students into a complex intellectual network of natural scientists, philosophers, and oral story-tellers throughout the ancient Mediterranean world. Readings include Near Eastern mythical narratives and Homeric poems and hymns; selections from the earliest Greek philosophers through Plato’s dialogues to Hellenistic and Roman philosophical schools; works from the famous Hippocratic corpus and Galen’s medical treatises; and various religious texts from ancient Greece and Rome, early Christianity, and late antiquity.

Zlatko Pleše

Zlatko Pleše received his PhD in Classics at Yale University, where he specialized in ancient philosophy and medicine, early Christianity, Hellenistic rhetoric and Coptic language. He taught at various universities in Europe and the US, including Yale and Wesleyan University, and is currently Professor of Ancient Mediterranean religions (Greco-Roman world, early Christianity and late antiquity) at Carolina. He has published monographs and articles on Platonist philosophers of the Roman imperial period, ancient Gnostic and Hermetic writings, apocryphal gospels, and early modern theories of nationhood in South-Eastern Europe.

 

RELI 67-001: Nature, Culture, and Self-Identity: Religion in the Construction of Social Life

FY Seminar | TTH, 3:30 PM – 4:45 PM | Instructor(s): Lauren Leve

Beliefs about what a human being is—and isn’t—lie at the root of all religious traditions and also of secular ideologies. This course explores the ways that different religious and cultural communities have conceptualized human nature, and how those understandings are reflected in diverse forms of personal identity and ways of organizing public life. Readings will include historic and contemporary texts, and case studies from places including India, Nepal, and the USA. We will structure our inquiries around three thematic questions: (1) How do religious beliefs and practices shape the way that individuals and societies understand what it is to be human? (2) How do these beliefs manifest in seemingly unrelated areas of life such as personal aspirations, gender ideals, social structures, political institutions, and economic ideologies? (3) How do we know what we know about these things—i.e., what theories and methods do scholars use to understand other societies and also their own? This course also involves an experiential component that allows students to undertake original research.

Lauren Leve

Lauren Leve received her Ph.D. in Cultural Anthropology. Now an associate professor of Religious Studies, she has been living and working in Nepal since 1990; sometimes for a few weeks at a time, sometimes for a few years. Her research has also brought her to Thailand, Sri Lanka, India, and Singapore. She has written on topics that include Buddhism, globalization, women’s empowerment, theories of rural revolution, human rights, and suffering. Her recent book is titled “The Buddhist Art of Living in Nepal: Ethical Practice and Religious Reform.” She is currently working on a project on gender, health, politics, and the rise of Christianity in Nepal. Professor Leve is grateful to the monks, nuns, householders, newly-literate women, NGO staff, Maoists, Christians and others who have opened their lives to her and taught her to (try to) see through their eyes. She reports that it’s a little disorienting at first, but that once you learn to learn from others’ perspectives, there’s no better way to live in the world!

 

RELI 73H-001: From Dragons to Pokemon: Animals in Japanese Myth, Folklore, and Religion

FY Seminar | TTH, 2:00 PM – 3:15 PM | Instructor(s): Barbara Ambros

This seminar examines the cultural construction of animals in Japanese myth, folklore, and religion. We will discuss various kinds of animals: those that occur in the natural world, those that are found in myths and folklore, and those that have appeared in popular media such as animation. We will explore how images of various animals were culturally constructed as tricksters, gods, monsters, or anthropomorphic companions; how animals were ritualized as divine, demonic, or sentient beings in Buddhism, Shinto, and folk religion; and how animals could serve as metaphors that embodied collective ideals or anxieties. Most of our readings will focus on primary and secondary texts from the Japanese tradition (in English), but we will also read theoretical texts on human-animal relationships and historical studies on animals in the larger Asian context. We will also view and analyze several Japanese films, both anime and documentaries, that deal with animals and environmental issues.

Barbara Ambros

Field of specialization: Religions of Asia. Research interests: Religions in early modern through contemporary Japan; gender studies; critical animal studies; place and space; and pilgrimage. Fun fact: she holds a third-degree black belt in Shotokan karate and serves as the faculty advisor for the UNC Shotokan Club.

 

ROML 55H-001: Writing with an Accent: Latino Literature and Culture

FY Seminar | TTH, 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM | Instructor(s): Oswaldo Estrada

This seminar focuses on the literary production of Latinos living in the U.S. Using a variety of materials (essays, documentaries, films, music) and English-language texts (novels, short stories, plays, poetry) we will examine works by Chicano, Peruvian-American, Nuyorican, Central-American-American, Dominican, and Cuban-American writers. Topics to be discussed include: Latino or Hispanic? What’s in a Name?; The politics of Bilingualism; The search for Home in Migrant, Rural, and Urban Environments; The Many Faces of Machismo; Religion and Spirituality in Latino Communities; Forms of Prejudice and Discrimination; Music as a Cultural Bridge. All readings will be in English, though knowledge of Spanish is desirable.

Oswaldo Estrada

Oswaldo Estrada is a Peruvian-American writer and literary critic. He is a Professor of Latin American Literature at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and has authored or edited over a dozen books of literary and cultural criticism. He is the author of a children’s book, El secreto de los trenes (2018), and of three collections of short stories, Luces de emergencia (2019; International Latino Book Awards 2020), Las locas ilusiones y otros relatos de migración (2020; International Latino and Latin American Book Fair Prize 2020), and Las guerras perdidas (2021). He has recently edited the short-story collection Incurables: Relatos de dolencias y males (2020; International Latino Book Awards 2020).

 

SOCI 71-001: The Pursuit of Happiness

FY Seminar | TTH, 9:30 AM – 10:45 AM | Instructor(s): Arne Kalleberg

Happiness is a fundamental goal in many societies, despite being elusive for many people. In recent years, social scientists have become increasingly interested in the subject of happiness and its causes and consequences. Sociologists, economists, political scientists, geographers, and psychologists have joined with philosophers in studying the nature of happiness and subjective well-being and its relationship to social life. This course will provide an overview of how these different disciplines study happiness. We will examine the interplay between individual and social happiness by considering the nature and meaning of happiness in the contemporary United States and in other countries. We will seek to answer questions such as: What is happiness? Can we measure happiness, and if so, how? Does happiness vary among diverse groups (racial, ethnic, religious, gender, age, and social class groups)? How does happiness differ among cultures and nations? What is the relationship between biology and happiness? Between psychology and happiness? Does money buy happiness? What is (and should be) the role of happiness in formulating public policies? We will address these and other questions by reading books and articles; by class discussions and debates; by viewing films; by interviewing people; and by collecting information using the Internet and other sources.

Arne Kalleberg

Dr. Arne Kalleberg is a Kenan Distinguished Professor of Sociology at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and has Adjunct Professorships in the Kenan-Flagler Business School, the Department of Public Policy, and the Curriculum in Global Studies. He is also the Editor of Social Forces, an International Journal of Social Research.

 

SOCI 89-001: College, Inequality, and Society

FY Seminar | TTH, 2:00 PM – 3:15 PM | Instructor(s): Kenneth Andrews

Universities are experiencing significant change and are the focus of intense debates. Some see college as an important equalizer that helps students reach their full potential and live more rewarding lives. Others see colleges as reinforcing inequalities and favoring students who are already privileged. Meanwhile, significant changes are underway include rising costs, greater competition, growing diversity, new technologies, and calls for greater accountability and oversight. We will read and reflect broadly on college and how higher education is changing, and we will conduct sociological research on three major themes. First, we will consider the sorting process – what factors shape who goes to college and where they go to college. Second, we will examine the social dimension – how the college experience shapes learning, identities, and relationships. Third, we will focus on the institutional context – how college is shaped by public policy, the economy, the legal system, and popular culture.

Kenneth Andrews

Kenneth (Andy) Andrews is a faculty member and chair of the Sociology Department. His research and teaching focuses on social movements and politics, especially whether and how movements lead to changes in policy, elections, and popular culture.

 

SOCM 89-001: Food Allergies in Everyday Life

FY Seminar | TTH, 12:30 PM – 1:45 PM | Instructor(s): Jill Fisher

Sharing food is central to social life as well as to the formation of cultural identities. We can see this in how people come together over food, structure their days around it, and perform national or ethnic identities through it. At the same time, food allergies are on the rise and introduce many challenges to individuals, families, and organizations. The situation is complicated by the fact that public awareness, responses from schools and other organizations, and regulatory safety measures tend to lag behind. This course explores the topic of food allergies through several important lenses: biomedical, political, cultural, and social. The course’s goals are to understand how living with and managing food allergies can be challenging to individuals and families, as well as to query how potential therapies for food allergies should be regulated and how schools and business should accommodate for food allergies. The course critically engages concepts such as risk/benefit, medicalization, disability, and quality of life to better understand the social and cultural values that shape perceptions of and responses to food allergies.

Jill Fisher

Jill A. Fisher, Ph.D. is Professor of Social Medicine in the Center for Bioethics at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She is the author of Medical Research for Hire: The Political Economy of Pharmaceutical Clinical Trials (Rutgers University Press, 2009) and Adverse Events: Race, Inequality, and the Testing of New Pharmaceuticals (New York University Press, 2020). She is currently conducting qualitative research on food allergy clinical trials to study the social and ethical issues that emerge from testing new medical therapies on children.

 

STOR 120-03F: Foundations of Statistics and Data Science

FY Launch | MWF, 9:05 AM – 9:55 AM | Instructor(s): Serhan Ziya | Lab/Recitation: STOR 120-408

This course teaches critical concepts and skills in computer programming and statistical inference, in conjunction with hands-on analysis of real-world datasets, including economic data, document collections, geographical data, and social networks. It delves into social issues surrounding data analysis such as privacy and design.

Serhan Ziya

Serhan Ziya is a Professor in the Department of Statistics and Operations Research. He holds a Ph.D. in Industrial and Systems Engineering from Georgia Institute of Technology. His specialization area is using mathematical modeling and data science in problems that are directly motivated by practical contexts. He is particularly interested in problems that are related to healthcare and emergency operations, but he has also been involved in research projects that are related to operational improvements in various business settings.

 

WGST 89H-001: Sexuality and Salvation

FY Seminar | TTH, 2:00 PM – 3:15 PM | Instructor(s): Sarah J. Bloesch

In Christianity and Islam, bodies populate the afterlife. What those bodies look like, how they act, what they feel, and who they engage with are subjects of contentious and long-standing debates. The various answers offered in these debates deeply affect Christian and Muslim responses to the body, sexuality, race, and gender in this life. This course examines how these two religious traditions’ diversity of histories and ideas construct theories of identity. In each tradition, we will look at attempts to dictate a wide variety of sexual norms and at the creativity followers have employed in interpreting such regulations. We examine the many ways that Muslims and Christians have used sexual practices, language, and images to enhance their devotion and pose questions about living out religion. This means analyzing how the afterlife affects earthly life, including family structures, health care debates, legal choices, questions of feminist agency, and imagery of war.

Sarah J. Bloesch

Sarah J. Bloesch (she/her) is a Teaching Assistant Professor of Women’s and Gender Studies at University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She teaches feminist and queer approaches to film, popular culture, and spirituality. Her research focuses on Christianity, gender, and race in the contemporary United States and how those aspects shape our understanding of sexuality, time, and relationships. She is the co-editor of the textbook Cultural Approaches to Studying Religion: An Introduction to Theories and Methods and loves spending time with her dog: a boxer mix, who is obviously the best puppy in the world.